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ORGANIZATION
OF THE CORNELL UNIVERSITY AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT

STATION

BOARD OF CONTROL
THE TRUSTEES OF THE UNIVERSITY

THE AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE AND STATION COUNCIL
JACOB GOULD SCHURMAN, President of the University.
ROBERT H. TREMAN, Trustee of the University.
LIBERTY H. BAILEY, Director of the College and Experiment Station.
EMMONS L. WILLIAMS, Treasurer of the University.
JOHN H. COMSTOCK, Professor of Entomology.
HENRY H. WING, Professor of Animal Husbandry.

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EXPERIMENTING STAFF.
LIBERTY H. BAILEY, Director.
ALBERT R. MANN, Secretary to the Director.
JOHN HENRY COMSTOCK, Entomology.
HENRY H. WING, Animal Husbandry.
JOHN CRAIG, Horticulture.
T. LYTTLETON LYON, Soil Investigations.
HERBERT J. WEBBER, Plant Breeding.
BENJAMIN M. DUGGAR, Plant Physiology.
JOHN L. STONE, Farm Practice.
JAMES E. RICE, Poultry Husbandry.
GEORGE W. CAVANAUGH, Chemistry.
ELMER O. FIPPIN, Soils.
WILLIAM A. STOCKING, Jr., Dairy Bacteriology.
HERBERT H. WHETZEL, Plant Pathology.
GEORGE F. WARREN, Farm Crops.
LOWELL B. JUDSON, Horticulture.
CHARLES S. WILSON, Pomology.
MERRITT W. HARPER, Animal Husbandry.
JAMES A. BIZZELL, Soil Investigations.
CHARLES A. PUBLOW, Dairy Industry.
CYRUS R. CROSBY, Entomology.
CLARENCE A. ROGERS, Poultry Husbandry.
PAUL J. WHITE, Farm Crops.
DONALD REDDICK, Plant Pathology.
HAROLD E. ROSS, Dairy Industry.
ARTHUR W. GILBERT, Plant Breeding.
HARRY H. LOVE, Plant Breeding.
CHARLES F. CLARK, Plant Breeding.
EDWARD R. MINNS, Farm Practice.
ELMER S. SAVAGE, Animal Husbandry.

November 30, 1909.

D. C.

The Governor of the State of New York,

Albany, N. Y. The Secretary of the Treasury,

Washington, D. C. The Secretary of Agriculture,

Washington, D. C. The Commissioner of Agriculture,

Albany, N. Y.

The Act of Congress, approved March 2, 1887, establishing Agricultural Experiment Stations in connection with the Land Grant Colleges, contains the following provision: “It shall be the duty of each of said stations, annually, on or before the first day of February, to make to the Governor of the State or Territory in which it is located, a full and detailed report of its operations, including a statement of receipts and expenditures, a copy of which report shall be sent to each of said stations, to the said Commissioner of Agriculture, and to the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States."

And the Act of the Legislature of the State of New York, approved April 12, 1906, providing for the administration of the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell University contains the following provision : “The said university shall expend such moneys and use such property of the state in administering said college of agriculture as above provided, and shall report to the commissioner of agriculture in each year on or before the first day of December, a detailed statement of such expenditures and of the general operations of the said college of agriculture for the year ending the thirtieth day of September then next preceding."

In conformity with these mandates I have the honor to submit on behalf of Cornell University the following report:

By its instruction of students, by its scientific investigations, by its extension work among the farmers of the State, the New York State College of Agriculture furnishes a superb vindication of its existence. It has cost the State some money, but the results it has achieved are worth tenfold or a hundredfold all that it has cost. The limits of this Report make impossible any save the most inadequate representation of the variety, extent, and importance of the work of the College and the Experiment Station. A more complete description of it is contained in the accompanying reports of the Director and the heads of the several departments which I beg you to consider an integral part of this report. And for your further information there are appended, besides the statements of financial expenditures required by law, the series of bulletins of the Agricultural Experiment Station for the year, Nos. 259 to 269 inclusive, the Agricultural Experiment Station circulars,

, Nos. 4 to 7 inclusive, the Cornell Reading-Course for Farmers leaflets, Series IX, Nos. 41 to 45 inclusive, the Cornell ReadingCourse for Farmers' Wives leaflets, New Series 1, Nos. I to 4 inclusive, the Home Nature-Study Course leaflets, New Series, Vol. V, Nos. I to 4 inclusive, and the Cornell Rural School leaflets, Vol. II, Nos. I to 9 inclusive,- in itself an imposing and instructive exhibit of the extent and variety of the practical work done by the College for farming and the farmer.

The success of the College has been due to the State's appreciation of the importance of agricultural education and the provision it has made for furnishing it, but the active agents in achieving such success have been the Director and the Faculty of the College, who have brought to the work a fund of energy, enthusiasm, mental ability, scientific attainment, pedagogical skill and devotion not surpassed in any other agricultural school in the country. Director Bailey is undoubtedly the foremost professor and director of agricultural work in America — at once an eminent scientist, a stimulating teacher, a brilliant popularizer, and an enthusiastic and inspiring leader. He is enjoying well earned rest in the year 1909-1910, for which the Trustees of the University have voted him a sabbatic leave. Herbert John Ilebber, Professor of Experimental Plant Breeding, has been appointed Acting Director for the year.

So rapid and so extensive has been the success of the College that enlargement on a vast scale has become an absolute necessity. In the words of Director Bailey, "We are now face to face with the problem either of developing space and equipment in the College of Agriculture or limiting the number of students who shall be received."

Registration in the College has grown steadily and rapidly since it became a State institution. The following table shows

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