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the nature of circumstances that might occur from day to day. He hoped, however, that the whole House would concur with him in his opinion, that the preparations to be made for our security should be in proportion to the preparations of the enemy, and not left as matter of chance and calculation. Whatever gasconading the enemy might use ; however much they might endeavour to delude their subjects, by holding out to them the wealth of this country as booty and plunder ; he was sure that in proportion as such language was held by them, in that same proportion would the spirit and zeal of the country be excited. By being so prepared, the country would be put into such a condition, that every man might sleep in peace in his bed ; and whoever should inculcate to the enemy that we had any thing to dread, that enemy would find, in every attempt they might make, nothing but confusion and destruction. He concluded by moving, “That leave be given to bring in a Bill to enable his • Majesty to order out a certain proportion of the Supplementary • Militia, and to provide for the necessary augmentation of men « in several companies of militia, by incorporating the Supple• mentary Militia therein.' Leave was given to bring in the Bill : the Bill was immediately brought in, read a first time, and ordered to be read a second time next day.

The Committees of Supply and Ways and Means were deferred from Friday till Monday.-Adjourned.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

Friday, Feb. 9. The Sheriffs of London presented a Petition from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, praying for leave to bring in a Bill to continue the Acts of the 7th and 17th of the present King, respecting the admeasurement of coals. The Petition was ordered to be referred to a Committee.

The Sheriffs of London presented another Petition from the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of . London, against the Wet Dock Bill, and praying to be heard by Council at the bar, against the said Bill.

Mr. Alderman Lushington said, that in order to prevent an idea that the City of London was inimical to the improvement of the port of London, he thought it right to say, that they were engaged in preparing a plan for such improvement. If that plan mould not be acceptable to the public, another ought to be adopted ; for certainly the port ought no longer to remain in its present defective state.

The City were permitted to be heard by their Council against the Bill.

The

The Chancellor of the Exchequer brought a Message from his Majesty, which was read by the Speaker. The Message was to the following effect :

“G.R. “His Majesty having taken into his Royal Conäideration the emi. nent and signal service performed by Lord Viscount Duncan, Ad. miral of the Blue, in an engagement with the Dutch Fleet, under the command of Admiral De Winter, on the rith of October last, a service not only honourable to himself, but highly beneficial to this kingdom ; and his Majesty being desirous to bestow some confiderable and lafting mark of his royal favour on the said Lord Viscount Duncan for such service, bath determined to give and grant to the said Lord Viscount Duncan, and to his two next succeeding heirs male, on whom his title shall descend, a net annuity of two thousand pounds. But his Majesty not having it in his power to give or to extend the same beyond the term of his own life, recommends to his faithful Commons to take such his intention into their consideration, and to adopt the necessary measures to enable his Majesty to give and grant the same, and to settle the said annuity on the said Lord Viscount Duncan, and his two next succeeding male beirs, on whom his title shall devolve, in such manner as may be most effectual for their benefit."

The Chancellor of the Exchequer moved that the Message might be referred to the confideration of the whole House, on Monday next.

Mr. Wilberforce Bird moved for an account of taxes ending the 5th of January, 1798.

Mr. Mainwaring presented a Petition for the repeal of an Act passed last Session, entitled, an act for imposing a duty on persons using clocks and watches. He observed, that the petition, as well as those presented before the recess, came from a large body of masters, dealers, and workmen. He understood it was not the intention of the Chancellor of the Exchequer to oppose the same; therefore he did not think it necessary to state the matter of the petition. He would only move, that the sea veral petitions presented to this House by the manufacturers in the different branches of the watch and clock-making business might be referred to a Committee, to report its opinion to the House.

The Bill for enabling his Majesty to embody the Supplementary Militia was read a fecond time.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer expressed a wish that the bill might be committed for Monday next. With respect to the principle of the bill, he was sure it could meet with no opposition ; but he had deferred the commitment of the bill till Monday, in order that Gentlemen might have time to consider of it. He then moved, that such a number of copies might be printed as would be necessary for the Members of the House. A djourned.

4 D 2

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

Monday, Feb. 12. On the Order of the Day being read for the House to resolve itself into a Committee, for the purpose of taking his Majesty's Message, respecting Lord Duncan, into consideration :

The Chancellor of the Exchequer said, that some circumstances had come to his knowledge respecting another illustrious naval commander, who had gained a brilliant naval victory, in another part of the world : he wished therefore to defer the consideration of his Majesty's Message till Wednesday, in order that both the cases might be taken into consideration at the same time.

Mr. Jekyll expressed his conviction that the Right Honourable Gentleman alluded to Lord St. Vincent.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer made a motion of assent.

Mr. Johnes inquired whether it was in the contemplation of Government to make any proposition respecting another dirtinguished commander, Sir Richard Onbow?

The Chancellor of the Exchequer replied, that he could not enter into the conlideration of the subject. No man had a higher respect and veneration than he had for Sir Richard OnNow ; but his Majesty's recommendation, upon occasions like the present, had always been confined to the Commanders in Chief.

Mr. Onslow faid, that connected as he was with the Gentleman alluded to, he wished only to say, that the inquiry made by an Honourable Member was entirely without his previous knowledge. Adjourncd.

HOUSE OF LORDS.

Tuesday, Feb. 13. Lord Grenville brought down two Messages from his Majesty, one relative to Lord Duncan, the other to the Earl St. Vincent. (The former was exactly similar to that brought down to the Commons on Friday the oth inftant; for the latter, see the proceedings of the House of Commons of this day.)

The Messages were ordered to be taken into consideration on Thursday the 15th instant, to which day the House adjourned.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

Tuesday, Feb. 13. The Chancellor of the Exchequer delivered the following Meffage from his Majesty :

« G.R. " His Majesty having taken into his royal consideration the cmi. nent and signal service of John Earl St. Vincent, Admiral of the

Blue,

QUSE OF Feb. i refales her ton at brought,

blue, in an engagement off Cape St. Vincent, on the 13th of Februarv, 1797, with the Spanish Fleet, under the command of Don Jofeph De Cordova, a service not only highly honourable to himself, but extremely beneficial to this kingdom ; and his Majesty being desirous to bestow some considerable and lasting mark of his royal frrour on the said John, Earl St. Vincent, for such service, huth determined to give and grant to the said Earl St. Vincent, and to his two next succeeding heirs male, to whom the title shall defcend, a net annuity of two thousand pounds. But his Majeity not having it in his power to give or to extend the same beyond the term of his own life, recommends to his faithful Commons to take such his intention into their consideration, and to adopt the necessary measures to enable his Majesty to give and grant the same, and to settle the said annuity on the said Earl St. Vincent, and his two next succeeding male heirs, on whom his title shall devolve, in such manner as may be most effectual for their benefit,” !

He moved, that the above Message be taken into consideration on the same day with the Message from his Majesty respecting Lord Duncan. Agreed to

In a Committee of the whole House, Mr. Rose moved that leave be given to bring in a Bill to amend the 28th of the King relative to the performance of quarantine.

The Corporation Causes Bill went through a Commitree. Ordered to be reported. Adjourned.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

Wednesday, Feb. 14. General Walpole said, that before the recers, he had given an intimation of his intention to bring forward a motion relative to the situation of the Maroons, and the treatment they had received. He understood that complaints had been made relative to losses that had been sustained by many of those unfortunate people ; and he wished to know, before he brought forward a motion, whether Government had taken any steps to alter their fituation, or redress the grievances they complained of?

Mr. Dundas said, he could not give a distinct answer to the Honourable Gentleman's enquiry, because the papers relating to the subject he had alluded to did not regularly come to his office; but he had received certain papers which he had not had time to peruse, and as soon as he thould, he would give the Honourable Gentleman all the information which they contained upon that subject.

HIS MAJESTY'S MESSAGE. The House resolved itself into a Committee to consider of the Message from his Majesty for granting an annuity to Lord Viscount Duncan.

The The Message respecting Lord St. Vincent was referred to the consideration of the same Committee. The Message being read,

The Chancellor of the Exchequer said, that he should not trouble the Committee, but as Lord St. Vincent's victory had priority in time, and as this day, the 14th of February, was also the anniversary of that victory gained by him, he should move the resolution for granting him an annuity first. He therefore moved, " That it is the opinion of this Committee, • that the annual sum of 2000l. be granted to his Majesty, out

of the Consolidated Fund, to commence on the 14th of Fe• bruary, 1797, to be settled on the Earl St. Vincent, and his (two next succeeding heirs on whom his title shall descend.'

Mr. Jekyll said, he was glad the Chancellor of the Exchequer had of himself mentioned that this was the anniversary of that glorious victory which it was now proposed to reward. It would remind the House, that his Majesty's Ministers had shamefully suffered a whole twelvemonth to elapse, without even mentioning the Earl St. Vincent, or expressing the least intimation that it was intended he should receive any pecuniary remuneration from the Throne. He was satisfied the public mind must have felt a considerable degree of indignation at the delay which Ministers had suffered to take place with respect to the proposed reward to Lord St. Vincent, as well as at the manner in which the business was now brought forward. The House inust have felt, the Committee must have felt, the public must have felt, and for himself he was persuaded at this moment, that so far from the proposed annuity to Lord St. Vincent being an act of justice and national gratitude due to his merits, it was merely compulsory on the part of Ministers, and adopted because they felt they could not do otherwise, while a similar proposition was made with regard to Lord Duncan. He remembered the time, however, when a Right Honourable Gentleman opposite to him, the near relation of that Noble Lord concerning whom a message had been first brought down to the House, spoke in raptures of the glorious achievements of Lord St. Vincent. He remembered that a Gentleman, who he believed was Member for Montgomery, and another Gentleman who represented the County of Suffolk, speaking of this event as one which stood unrivalled in the naval annals of the country ; as one of such magnitude with respect to the advantages it had rendered the country ; as one reflecting such glory on the British name, that it deserved to be peculiarly marked with some distinguishing honour on the part of the Crown. At that time a miserable question of form was interposed as an obstacle to that address, although an Honour

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