Selected Poems

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Psychology Press, 2003 - 142 páginas
John Skelton (1464?-1529) is the first great modern English poet. Immensely proud of his poetic calling, he celebrates in his poems the language itself, in all its richness. He wrote in a vigorous vernacular, taking literary English out of the medieval world and enriching it with new forms and tones. Gerald Hammond's notes and glossary illuminate Skelton's works for the modern reader - but Hammond warns readers to keep their wits about them. Skelton is a poet of verbal ambushes, who still has the power to surprise and shock with his formal inventiveness and his indictments of church, scholars and state. His tone can be tender, insinuating, savage and erotic; satire, parody, lyricism and allegory abound.
 

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Introduction
9
My Darling Dear My Daisy Flower
23
Philip Sparrow
39
The Tunning of Elinour Rumming
73
Speak Parrot
91
from The Garland of Laurel
108
Notes
130
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Acerca del autor (2003)

As a royal tutor, parson, orator, poet-satirist, and courtier, Skelton has been called one of the most remarkable poets between Chaucer and Spenser, an imaginative, unpredictable precursor of the Renaissance. A Ballade of the Scottys she Kynge (1513) celebrates the victory of the English forces of Henry VIII under the Earl of Surrey over the army of James IV at the battle of Flodden. Magnificence (1516) is an allegory in which the generous prince Magnificence is first destroyed by his own ill-advised generosity, then restored by Goodhope, Perseverance, and related virtues. He was awarded the degree of laureate by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge and was chosen as tutor to the young Prince Henry, who became Henry VIII. When Erasmus (see Vol. 4) visited England, he called Skelton "the one light and glory of British letters," mainly because of his translations of the classics and his Latin verses. Skelton directed his satire against the clergy, particularly Cardinal Wolsey, the target of Colin Clout (1522). After a lifelong hatred of Henry's chancellor, Skelton was finally forced to the sanctuary of Westminster in 1523 for writing Why Came Ye Not To Court (1522). While in confinement, he purified and simplified his style. He died before Wolsey met his downfall.

Gerald Hammond was born in 1926. He was an architect for thirty years before retiring in 1982. He has written over thirty mystery novels and is the creator of John Cunningham, dog breeder in Scotland, and Keith Calder, gunsmith. He also writes under the pseudonyms Arthur Douglas and Dalby Holden.

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