A Rhetorical Grammar: In which Improprieties in Reading and Speaking are Detected, and the True Sources of Elegant Pronunciation are Pointed Out : with a Complete Analysis of the Voice, Showing Its Specific Modifications, and how They May be Applied to Different Species of Sentences and the Several Figures of Rhetoric : to which are Added Outlines of Composition, Or Plain Rules for Writing Orations and Speaking Them in Public

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Cummings and Hilliard, 1822 - 383 páginas
 

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Página 226 - And when the sun begins to fling His flaring beams, me, Goddess, bring To arched walks of twilight groves, And shadows brown that Sylvan loves Of pine, or monumental oak, Where the rude axe with heaved stroke Was never heard the Nymphs to daunt, Or fright them from their hallowed haunt.
Página 176 - Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen ; Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace.
Página 43 - O thou that, with surpassing glory crowned, Look'st from thy sole dominion like the god Of this new World — at whose sight all the stars Hide their diminished heads — to thee I call, But with no friendly voice, and add thy name, 0 Sun, to tell thee how I hate thy beams, That bring to my remembrance from what state 1 fell, how glorious once above thy Sphere...
Página 172 - While from the bounded level of our mind Short views we take, nor see the lengths behind : But more...
Página 244 - Annual for me, the grape, the rose renew The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings; For me, health gushes from a thousand springs; Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise; My foot-stool earth, my canopy the skies.
Página 176 - All Nature is but art, unknown to thee All chance, direction, which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good: And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.
Página 177 - When the proud steed shall know why man restrains His fiery course, or drives him o'er the plains ; When the dull ox, why now he breaks the clod, Is now a victim, and now Egypt's god : Then shall man's pride and dulness comprehend His actions', passions', being's use and end ; Why doing, suffering, check'd, impell'd; and why This hour a slave, the next a deity.
Página 169 - Hurled headlong flaming from the ethereal sky With hideous ruin and combustion down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell In adamantine* chains and penal fire, Who durst defy the Omnipotent to arms.
Página 242 - So cowardly ; and, but for these vile guns, He would himself have been a soldier.
Página 243 - tis true, this god did shake : His coward lips did from their colour fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre : I did hear him groan : Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried ' Give me some drink, Titinius,

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