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engaged in rebellion against the United States Government, who are now in close custody, have made their_submission to the authority of the United States and applied to the President for pardon under his proclamation; and whereas, the authority of the Federal Government is sufficieu I yrestored in the aforesaid States to admit of the enlargement of said ersons from close custody, it is ordered that t ey be released on giving their respective aroles to appear at such time and place as the resident may designate, to answer any charge that he may direct to be preferred against them; and also that they will respectively abide until further orders in the

laces herein designated, and not depart therefrom: John A. Campbell, in the State of Ala bama; John H. Reagan, in the State of Texas; Alexander H. Ste hens, in the State of Georgia; George A. Trenho m, in the State of South Carolina; and Charles Clark, in the State of Mississippi. And if the President should grant his pardon to any of said persons, such person’s parole will be thereby discharged.

. Asnsaw Jonssou, President. Martial Law Withdrawn from Kentucky, Octoher 12, 1865.

Whereas by a proclamation of the fifth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixtyfour, the President of the United States, when the civil war was flagrant, and when combinations were in progress in Kentucky for the pur

ose of incitin'Jr insurgent raids into that State,

irected that the proclamation suspending the writ of habeas cor us should be made effectual in Kentucky, and t at martial law should be established there and continue until said proclamation should be revoked or modified;

And whereas since then the danger of insurgent raids into Kentucky has substantially passed away:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, by virtue of the authorit vested in me by the Constitution, do hereby eclare that the said proclamation of the fifth day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, shall be, and is hereby, modified in so far that martial law shall be no longer in force in Kentucky from and after the date hereof.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this twelfth

day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixt five, and of the Independence of t e United States of America the ninetieth. ANDREW J ouxsox.

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By the President:
W. I-Iusrnn, Acting Secretary of State.

Annulling the Suspension of the Habeas Corpus, December 1, 1865

Whereas by the proclamation of the President of the United States of the fifteenth day of September, one thousand eight hundred and sixtythree, the privilege of the writ of habcas corpus was, in certain cases therein set forth, suspended throughout the United States;

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And whereas the reasons for that suspension may be regarded as having ceased in some of the States and Territories:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim and declare that the sus ension _ aforesaid, and all other proclamations an orders suspending the privile e of the writ of habcas corpus in the States an Territories of the United States, are revoked and annulled exceptingas to the States of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Geor ia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Ar ansas, and Texas, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of New Mexico and Arizona.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington this first day of December, in the ear of our Lord one thousand eioht hun red and sixty-five, ‘1 and of the independence of the United

States of America the ninetieth.

ANDREW Jonnson.

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By the President:
WILLIAM H. Suwann, Secretary of State.

Announcing that the Rebellion has ended, April 2,1866.

Whereas, by proclamations of the fifteenth and nineteenth of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, the President of the United States, in virtue of the power vested in him by the Constitution and the laws, declared that the laws of the United States were opposed, and the execution thereof obstructed 1n the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas,by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law; .

And whereas, by another proclamation made on the sixteenth day of Au st, in the same year, in pursuance of an act of ‘ongressa proved July thirteenth, one thousaan eight hun red and sixty-one, the inhabitants ofthe States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Florida (except the inhabitants of that part of the State of Virginia lying west of the Alleghany mountains, and to such other parts ofthatState and the other States before named, as might maintain a loyal adhesion to the Union an the Constitution,or might be from time to time occupied and controlled by forces of the United States engagedin the dispersion of insur~ gents) were declared to be in a state of insurrection avainst the United States;

An whereas, by another reclamation of the first day of July, one thousan eightbundred and sixty-two, issued in pursuance of an act of Congress approved June 7, in the same year, the insurrection was declared to be still existing in the States aforesaid, with the exception of certain specified counties in the State of Virginia;

And whereas, by another proclamation made on the second day of April, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, in pursuance of the act of Congress of July 13, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, the exceptions named in the

roclamation-‘of August 16, one thousand eight

undred and sixty~one were revoked, and the inhabitan'ts of the States ofGeor ia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Tennessee, A.abama, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas, Mississi pi, Florida, and Virginia, (except the forty-eight counties of Vir inia

esignated as West Virginia, and the ports of ew Orleans, Key West, Port Royal, and Beaufort, in South Carolina,) were declared to be still in a state of insurrection a aiust the United States. _ And whereas the ouse of Representatives, on the 22d day of Jul , one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, a opted a resolution in the words following, namely:

"Resolved by the .House of Representatives of the Congress of the United States, That the present deplorable civil war has been forced upon the country by the disunionists of the southern States, now in revolt against the constitutional Government, and in arms around the capital; that in this national emergency Congress, banishing all feelin s of mere passion or resentment, will recollect ondy its duty to the whole country; that this war is not waged on our part in any spirit of oppression, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the ri hts or established institutions of those States; 'ut to defend} and maintain the supremac of the Constitution and to preserve the Union wit all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease."

And whereas the Senate of the United States, on the 25th ,-day of July, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, adopted a resolution in the words following, to wit:

“Resolved, That the 'present deplorable civil war has been forced upon the country by' the disunionists of the southern States, now in revolt against the censtitutional Government, and in arms around the capital; that in this national emergency Congress, banishing all feeling of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that this war is not prosecuted on our part in any spirit of 0p

ression nor for any purpose of conquest or en iougation, nor purpose of overthrowing or inter fering with the rights or established iiistitutions of those States,'but to defend and maintain the supremacy-of the Constitution and all laws made in ursuance thereof, and to preserve the Union wit all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease."

And whereas these resolutions, though pot 'oint or concurrent in form, are substantially identical, and as such may be regarded as having expressed the sense of Congress upon the subject to which they relate ;

And whereas, by my proclamation of the thirteenth day of June last, the insurrection in the State of Tennessee was declared to have been suppressed, the authority of the United States therein to be undisputed, and such United States

, ificers as had been duly commissioned to be in the undisputed exercise of their official functions;

And whereas there now exists no organized armed resistance of misguided citizens or others

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to the authority of the United States in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Florida, and the laws can be sustained and enforced therein by the proper civil authority, State or Federal, and the

eople of the said States are well and loyally

isposed, and have conformed or will conform in then legislation to the condition of affairs growing out ofthe amendment to the Constitution of the United States, rohibiting slavery within the limits and juris iction of the United States;

And whereas, in view of the before recited premises, it is the manifest determination of the American eople that no State, of its own will, has the rig tor the power to go out of, or separate itself from, or be separated from the American Union, and that therefore each State ought to remain and constitute an integral part of the United States ;

And whereas the people of the several beforementioned States have, in the manner aforesaid,

iven satisfactory evidence that they acquiesce in this sovereign and important resolution of national unity; ' '

And whereas it is believed to be a fundamental principle of government that people who have revoltcd, and who have been overcome and subdued, must either be dealt with so as to induce them voluntarily to become friends, or else they must be held by absolute military power, or devastated, so as to prevent them from ever a sin doin harm as enemies, which last-named po 'cy is abhorrent to humanity and freedom;

And whereas the Constitution of the United States provides for constituent communities only as States and not as Territories, dependencies, provinces, or protectorates; ‘

And whereas such constituent States mustneoessarily be and by the Constitution and laws of the United States are made equals and placed upon a like footing as to political rights, immunities, di nity, and power, with the several States wit which they are united;

And whereas the observance of political e uality as a principle of ri ht and justice is wel calculated to encourage t e people of the aforesaid States to be and become more and more constant and persevering in their renewed allegiance;

And whereas standing armies, military occupation, martialjlaw, military tribunals, and the suspension of the privilege of the writ of habeas corpus are, in time of peace, dangerous to public liberty, incompatible with the individual rights of the citizen, contrary to the genius and s irit of our free institutions, and exhaustive o the national resources, and ought not, therefore, to be sanctioned or allowed, except in cases of actual necessity, for repelling invasion or suppressing insurrection or rebellion;

And whereas the policy of the Government of the United States, from the beginning of the insurrection to its overthrow and final sup ression, has been in conformity with the princip es herein set forth and enumerated:

Now, therefore, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do hereby proclaim and declare that the insurrection which heretofore existed in the States of Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia, North Carolina, ennessee,

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EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 7, 1866.

It is eminentl right and proper that the Government of the United States should give earnest and substantial evidence of its just appreciation of the services of the patriotic men who, when the life of the nation was imperiled, entered the arm and navy to reserve the integrity of the nion, defend the overnment, and maintain and perpletuate unimpaired its free institutions. It is t erefore directed:

First. That in appointments to oflice in the several executive departments of the General Government and the various branches of the public service connected with said departments,

reference shall be given to such meritorious and honorably discharged soldiers and sailors, particularly those who have been disabled by wounds received or diseases contracted in the 'line of duty, as may possess the proper qualifi< cations.

Second. That in all promotions in said departments and the several branches of the public service connected therewith, such persons shall have preference, when equally eligible and

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Wssm'sorox, D. 0., April 27, 1866. To Gov. WORTH: I am directed by the President to inform you that by his proclamation of April 2, 1866, it was not intended to interfere with military commissions at that time or previously organized, or trials then pending before such commissions, unless by special instructions the accused were to be turned over thecivil authorities. General Ruger has been instructed to proceed with the trial to which you refer; but before the execution of any sentence rendered by said commission, to report all the proceedings to the War Department for examination and revision. There has been an order this day prepared. and which will soon be issued, which will relieve and settle all embarrassment growing out ofa misconstruction oi the proclmualion, of which I will send you a copy. Enwrmn Coons, ' Acting .Private Secretary to the President.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT Gssnasn‘s OFFICE, Wasnmcrou, May 1, 1866. General Orders No. 26:

Whereas some military commanders are embarrassed by doubts as to the operation of the proclamation of the President, dated the 2d day of April, 1866, upon trials by military courtsmartial and military offenses, to remove such doubts, it is ordered by the President that—

Hereafter, whenever offenses committed by civilians are to be tried where civil tribunals are in existence which can tr them, their cases are not authorized to be, an will not be, brought before military courts-martial or commissions, but will be committed to the proper civil authorities. This order is not ap lllcable to camp followers, as provided for no er the 60th Article of War, or to contractors and others specified in section 16, act of July 17, 1862. and sections 1 and 2, act of March 2,1863. Persons and offenses co nizable by the Rules and Articles of War, an by the acts of Congress above cited, will continue to be tried and punished by military tribunals as prescribed by the Rules and Articles of War and acts of Congress, hereinafter cited, to wit:

. Sixtieth of the Rules and Articles of War. All sutlers and retainers to the camp, and all persons whatsoever serving with the armies of the United States in the field, though not enlisted soldiers, are to be subject to orders according to the rules and discipline of war. * * '1

By order of the Secretar of War:

. D. Towssnnn, Assistant Adjutant General:

Against the Fenian Invasion of Canada, June 6, 1866. '

Whereas it has become known to me that certain evil~disposed persons have, within the territory and jurisdiction of, the United States,. begun and set on foot, and have provided and.“ prepared, and are still engaged in providing» and preparing, means for a military expeditio and enterprise, which ex edition and enterprise isto be carried on from t e territory and jurisdiction of the United States against colonies, districts, and people of British North America, within the dominions of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, with which said colonies, districts, and people, and kingdom the United. States are at peace;

And whereas the proceedin s aforesaid constitute a high misdemeanor, for idden by the laws of the United States, as well as by the law of nations:

Now, therefore, for the pur 0se of' prevsnting the carrying on of the un awful expedition and enterprise aforesaid, from the territory and jurisdiction of the United States, and to maintain the public peace, as well as the national honor, and enforce obedience and respect to the

laws of the United States, I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, do admonish and warn all good citizens of the United States against taking part in or in any wise aiding, countenanciu ,or abettin said unlawful proceedings, andT do exhort a 1 judges, magistrates, marshals, and officers in the service of the United States, to employ all their awful authority and ower to prevent and defeat the aforesaid unawful proceedings, and to arrest and bring to justice all persons who may be engaged therein.*

And, pursuant to the act of Congress in such case made and provided, I do furthermore authorize and empower Major General George G. Meade, commander of the Military Division of the Atlantic, to emplo the land and naval forces of the United States and the militia thereof, to arrest and prevent the setting on foot and car ing on the expedition and enterprise aforesaid.

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III.

ACTION OF THE CONVENTIONS AND LEGISLATURES OF THE LATELY INSURREOTIONARY STATES.

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NORTH CAROLINA.

1865, April 27—Gen. Schofield announced the cessation of hostilities within that State.

April 28—Gen. Schofield issued an order that, under the emancipation proclamation, all persons heretofore held as slaves are now free, and that it is the duty of the army to maintain their freedom.

May 29—William W. Holden appointed Provisional Governor.

June 12—Provisional Governor Holden issued his proclamation announcing his purpose to order an election for a convention, and to appoint justices of the peace to administer the oath of allegiance and conduct the election, 8m.

July —President Johnson ordered the cotton of the State to be restored to her, and the

' proceeds of all that had been sold- to be paid to er agents.

August 8—Provisional Governor Holden fixed Thursday, September 21, for the election of a convention.

Voters’ qualifications are thus prescribed:

“ No person will be allowed to vote whois not a voter qualified as prescribed by the constitution and laws of the State in force immediately before the 20th day of May, 1861, except that the payment of poll tax shall not be re uired.

“ All paroled soldiers of the army an navy of the pretended Confederate States, or of this State, and all paroled oficers of the army and navy of the pretended Confederate States, or of this State, under and including the rank of colonel, if of the army, and under and including the rank of lientenant, if of the navy, will be allowed to vote, pro

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vided they are hot included in any of the fourteen excluded classes of the President’s amnesty proclamation; and, provided further, that they are citizens of the State in accordance with the terms prescribed in the preceding paragraph.

“ No erson will be allowed to vote who does not exhibit to the inspectors a copy of the amnesty oath, as contained in the President’s proclamation of May 29, 1865, signed by himself and certified by at least two justices of the peace."

The convention to meet October 2.

September 29—The colored peo le of the State metin coantion in Raleigh, an petitioned for legislation to secure com ensation for labor, and enable them to educate t ieir children, and asking protection for the family relation, and for the repeal of oppressive laws making unjust discriminations on account of race or color.

October 2—Convention met.

October 7—The secession ordinance declared “ null and void.”

October 9—An ordinance passed, declaring slavery forever rohibited within the State.

October 10—8rdinance passed, providing for an election for Governor, members of the Le islature, and seven members ofCongress Novem er 9, the Provisional Governor to give the certifi~ cates. Each member of the Legislature, and each voter to be qualified “ according to the now existing constitution of the State’ : 'Provided, That no one shall be eligible to a seat, or be ca~ pable of voting, who, being free in all res ects, shall not, before May 29, 1865, have taken resident Lincolu’s amnesty oath, or have taken President Johnson’s oath, and who shall not in either case be of the excepted classes. All persons who have preferred petitions for pardon shall be deemed to have been pardoned if the fact of being pardoned shall be announced by the Governor, altliou h the‘ pardOn may not have been received. ' he payment of a public tax shall not be required as a qualification of_the voter in the elections in November next.

October lZ—Convention tabled a proposition to prohibit the pa 'ment of the war debt created by the State in aid of the rebellion.

October 16—Ordinance passed, dividing the State into seven congressional districts.

October l7—Resolution ado ted, requesting Congress to repeal the “ test-oat ."

October 18—President Johnson sent this telegram:

Exncurrvr: OFFICE, Wasnnseros, D. 0., October 18, 1855.

W. W. HOLDEN, Provisional Governor:

Every dollar of the debt created to aid the rebellion against the United States should be repudiated finally and forever. The great mass of the people should not be taxed to ay a debt to aid in carrying on a rebellion w ich they in fact, if left to themselves, were opposed to. Let those who have given their means for the obligations of the State look to that power they tried to establish in violation of law, constitution, and will of the people. They must meet their fate. It is their misfortune, and cannot be recognized by the people of any State tprofessing themselves 10 al to the government 0 the United States an in the Union. I repeat that the loyal people of North Carolina should be exonerated from the payment of every dollar of indebtedness created to aid in carrying on the rebellion. I trust and hope that the people of North Carolina will wash their hands of everything that partalres in the slightest degree of the rebellion, which has been so recently crushed by the stron arm of the Government in carrying out the 0 ' ligations imposed by the Constitution of the Union. ANDREW Jonssorr,

Bresident of the United States.

October 19—Ordinance passed, that no oflicer of this State who may have taken an oath of oflice to support the constitution of the Confederate States, shall be capable of holdincr under tle State any office of trust or profit w ich he held when he took such oath, until he ma be a ointed or re-elected to the same; and al the o ces lately held by such persons are hereby declared vacant.

October 19—Convention—yeas 84, nays 12— passed an ordinance prohibityng the assum tion of the State debt created in aid of the robe lion. An amendment to refer this question to a vote of the people, lost.

November 9—Election of State officers and Representatives in Congress. Same day, ordinances repealing secession ordinance and antislavery ordinance, submitted to popular vote, and approved.

November 13—Legislature met.

_ December 1-—The Legislature ratified, with 51x dissenting voices, the anti-slavery amendment. .

December Q—Jonathan Worth declared elected

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1865, Ma IO—Governor Clark called an extra session of t e Legislature for the 18th, to order a State Convention.

Ma 21—Ma'or General O'Inby telegraphed as folibws to l\ ajor General Warren, commanding the department: “ By direction of the President, you will not recognize any officer of the Confederate or State government, within the limits of your command, as authorized to exercise in any manner whatever the functions of their late ofiices. You will prevent, by force if necessary, any attempt of any of the legislatures of the States in insurrection to assemble for legislative purposes, and will imprison any members or other persons who may attempt to exercise these functions in opposition to your orders."

June IS—William L. Sharkey appointed Provisional Governor.

July l—Prov. Gov. Sharkey issued a proclamation a pointing local officers, and fixing an election or a Convention—August 7th—voters to have these qualifications:

“ Voters for delegates to this convention must possess the qualifications required by the constitution and laws as they existed prior to the 9th day of January, 1861, and must also produce a certificate that they have taken, before a competent officer, the amnesty oath prescribed by the proclamation of the 29th of May, 1865, which certificate shall be attached to or accompanied b a copy of the oath, and no one will be eligibib as a member of this convention who has not also taken this oath."

August 14—Convention met.

August 15—President Johnson sent this tele~ gram:

' Exncnrrvn Orrren, WASHINGTON, D. 0., August 15, 1865. Governor W. L. SHARKEY, Jackson, Mas. :

I am gratified to see that on have organized your Convention without di culty. "I hope that without delay your Convention will amend your State constitution, abolishing slayery and denying to all future legislatures the power to levislate that there is pro verty in man; also that they ' will adopt the amen ment to the Constitution of the United States abolishing slavery. If you could extend the elective franchise to all persons of color who 'can read the Constitution of the United States in English and write their names, and to all persons of color who own real estate valued at not less than two hundred and fifty dollars, and pay taxes thereon, on would completely disarm the adversary an set an example the other States will follow. This you can do with perfect safety, and you thus place the southern States, in reference to free persons of lcolor, upon the same basis with the free States. I hope and trust your convention will do this, and, as a consequence, the radicals, who are wild upon negro franchise, will be completely foiled in their attempt to keep the southern States

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