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As Congress has never yet given its sanction to that claim; or made any. appropriation for its payment, it is very desirable that, in its final proceedings concerning the affairs of the Government with the Bank, some special direction should be included on that subject, as''well as on the reports to be required, and agency exercised over the ivterests of the United States in the Bank'the ensuing iwo years, by any public officer.

A direction seems proper also, as in 1812, concerning the receipt of the bills of the Bauk for public dues, after the third of March next; and on the disposition or investinent of the interest of the United States in its capital stock, whenever paid over to the Treasury. Some explicit action of Congress on the subject of the above ciaim for damages, is very desirable in another view, so as to enable this Department, in case of the receipt of any part of the French indemnity, to decide correctly whether the dividends seized by the Bank should, in any event, be considered the loss of the United States; or should be deducted from the amount received for the claimants under the treaty, in whose behalf the '-business was transacting, in which the demand for damages originated, and to whose credit the present act of Congress requires shall be paid into the Treasury, only "the nett proceeds" of each instalment.

VII.-MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS. In the course of the past year, the Departinent has, at various ports, discontioved, as not necessary, fourteen custom-house officers, and a others reduced the compensación of a few. This has enabled it to augment the nunber and conipensation at some other points, where the increase of business appeared to demand it, though not, in all places to the extent desired. From the diminished temptation to smuggling, under our reduced tariff, this Department has selt justified in lessening the number of rerenue cutters iwo, or one terth of the whole; the number of boats ihree, and the number of officers and men over fifty, making hereafter au anoual saving in these respects of about $20,000 After full inquiry, all has been effected on this subject which the public interests appear now to justify, the expenses of collection in this and other particulars should be considered in reference to the gross, and not as is sometimes inadvertently done, the nett revenue; the former being the amount which the custom-house establishment must actually assess; and the difference

between them being in part paid out for other objects than the mere'expenses of collection; such as bounties on the fisheries, and refunding of liuties. In deciding on the reasonableness of those expenses, it inust be manifest that a certain number of officers, cullers, boais, &c, equal to the collection of a large sum, cannot be dispensed with, at many places, for any revenue, howerer small, is to be collected ; else there'would be no

adequate security against iilicit trade, and no means of furnishing proper ettries, clearances, and other papers, to those engaged in navigation, though their trade may be almost exclusively in the preseyt large amount of free goods, or in our widely extended coasting business.

In computing the rate per cent. for collecting the revenue, it must also be remembered that the rate is larger as the amount collected diminishes, and smaller as it increases, though the whole actual expense of collection per annum remains the same. Furthermore, the necessary cost of collecting $30,000,000 at the same ports obviously need be but little more than

to collect half that sum, though the per centage, in one case, will be double what it is in the other. This Department, since the reduction of the whole duties to be collected in 1833, and the corresponding decrease in the inducements to smuggle, bas endeavored to reduce the wbole actual expenses, and has, in some degree, been successful; though the whole cost of collection may still constitute a larger per ceutage than at some former periods, as the whole amount of revenue is so much lessened.

Thus, from 1790 to 1794, that cost, though small in itself, rose in some of those years to niore than 55 per cent. on a small revenue, or to about the same as in 1833 and '34, and which is quite two per cent. lower than the average in Englaud, and four per cent lower than in France, But, in most intermediate years, for reasons before stated, and others too obvious for recital, the cost for collecting our revenue from customs, as well as lands, has seldom exceeded 31 per cent., and from the latter is now probably not half that rate. Besides the explanations already given on this subject, it is hoprd that the new expenses will ere long cease, which have recently been imposed on the collection of the reveuue, by the necessary preparations for making, and the actual manufacture of useful and im

portant standard weights and measures, and uniform sets thereof, for all the custom-houses in the United States

In addition to the recommendations in the last annual report as to light houses, it may be observed that this Department, during the recess of Congress, deemed it proper to cause a thorough inquiry to be instituted into the whole subject. The inquiry extended to the propriety of discontinuing any of the present light-houses, or of building others; the expediency of changing the height or material of any of ihese edifices; the best manner of lighting them, in respect to the kind or number of lamps or reflectors; the various substances, used, and most suitable to give the best light at the smallest expense; and, in fine, the economy of managing the whole establishment: With this was combined a system of uniform instructions to the liglie-house keepers, for the discharge of their public duties. . The report of the Fifth Auditur, and the correspondence growing out of this inquiry, develope some interesting faets; and the whole proceedings will, with pleasure, be laid before Congress at sone other appropriate opportunity.

The report of the Commissioner of the General Land Office is accom. panied by so many long and important documents, that it is here with submitted in a separate communication. Beside the remarks made a year since by this Department on the rapid increase of duties in that bureau, and the corresponding necessity for an increase of clerks to dispose of it promptly and correctly, the experience of the present year has, by the vast sales of lands which have occurred, added new force to all that was then urged. Taking either the nuinber of acres soll, or the amount of money received, as à guide, it will be seen by the table (see page 291,] that the business has more than doubled within the past five years.

The recommendations contained in the Conımissioner's report will, it is hoped, receive that early and grave attention which the convenience and interests of the whole country, and especially the southwest and west, seem imperiously to require. As a subject of retrenchment,covnected with

this bureau, where the character of the business will permit, it is suggest

ed to Congress whether it might not be advisa ble to discontinue the Joffices in a few districts and annex them to the adjoining ones, on the ground that the public sales recently inade at them, or anticipated hereafter, are not sufficient to justify tbe expense of continuing them at distinct offices,

Several other subjects, suggested for consideration to the last Congress, and pot finally acted upon, are again, respectfully, urged ou its attention, without going into a repetition of the views theo submitted in relation to them.

Among the priocipal were, the change in the commencement of the fiscal year; a' reorganization of the Treasury Department, especially

to increase some of its checks; further control over some of its discretionary powers, by more specific regulations as to the deposite banks, and the keeping and disbursing of the public money; the revision of the laws as to the marine hospital fund; rebuilding the Treasury offices ; legisla

vion on the provisoes in the aét of July 14, 1832, anid osher points, to enforce the spirit of the present tariff ; and making new provisions on the 914mber and compensation of custom-house officers. In the report and bill connected with this last matter were includeri several suggestions for further changes in the present systein for collecting our revenue from cusionis, to v:hich, on some future occasion, will be subjoined such as have nince occurred from additional experience and inquiries.

Various other subjects, specially-devolved on the head of this Depariment, have received the attention and labor which they appeared to-deserve ; but, from the length to which this report has already extended, the proceedings in relation to them, will, at an early day, be separately communicated to Congress. All which is respectfully submitted.

LEVI WOODBURY, Secretary of the Treasury. To the How. JAMES K. POLK, Speaker of the House of Reps.

Slolement exhibiting the ralue of Imports, compared wilh the value pay

ing duly, the value free of duty, and also with the valuie exported of dulrable goods, and the consumplion of dutiable arlicles, during the yenirs ending on the 30th September, 1832, 1833, 1934, and 1835.

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1932 $ 101,029,266 $86,779,813 $14,249,453 $18,448,857 $68,330,956 1833 108, 118,311 75,670,361 32,447,950 12,411,969 63,258,392 1834 126,521,332 58,128,152 68,393, 180 10,879,520 47,248,632 1835* 151,030,368. 73,587,132 77,443,236 7,390,465 66,196,667

• The Imports and Exports during the quarter ending on the 30th September, are made up, in part, on estimates received from Collectors.

Statement of the Estimates of Expenditures and Revenue, as exhibited in the reports

of the Secretary of the Treasury; also, the actual appropriations and expenditures, with the imports and exports, for the years 1833, 1834, and 1835.

1833.
1834.

1835. Whole estimates for ex.

penditures.......... $25,295,237 17 $23,501,994 85 $17,183,541 52 Whole estimates for con. tingent expenditure..

2,500,000 00 Whole appropriations.. 32,695,782 65 20,968,992 49 17,720,908 57 Whole actual expend's 24, 257,298 49 24,601,982 44| 18,176,141 07 Whole est's for revenue: 24,000,000 00 18,500,000' 00 20,000,000 00 Whole actual revenue. 33,948,426 25 21.791,935 551 28,230,881 07 Exports : Domestic..... 70,317,698° 00 81,024,162 00 98,531,026 00

Foreign....... 19,822,735 00 23,312,311 00 20,424,213 00 Total Exports....

.......$ 90,140,433 00 104,336,973 00 118,955,239 00 Total Imporis........ 8!108,118,311:00 126,521,332 00 151,030,368 00

DETAILS.
Estimates form,
Civil, miscellaneous, &

foreign intercourse... 3,739,361 70 2,800,897 33 2,788,225 85 Military...

10,873,790 09 11;654,942 25 9,672,654 50 Naval,

3,777,429 38 4.051,073 19 4,672,661 17 Public Debt....

7,299,656 00 4,995,082 08 | 50,000 00 Contingent expendit'res

2,500,000 00 Appropriations for

25,295,237 17 23,501,994 85 19,683,541 52 Civil, niscellaneous, &

foreign intercourse... 5,796,723 57 4,614,015 04 3,582,853 95 Military

13,031,187 07 11,776,604 08 9,139,820 49 Naval.......

3,867,872 01

4,578,373 37 4,998,234 13 Public Debt...... 10,000,000 00 Expendilures for

32,695,782 65 20,968,992 49! 17,720,903 57 Civil, miscellaneous, &

foreign intercourse... 5,716,245 93 4,404,728 35 3,705,368 53 Military ........ 13,096,152 43 10,064,427 88 9,507,635 36 Naval......

3,901,356 75 3,956,260 42 4,916,999 80 Public Debt.........

1,543,543 38 6,176,565 19 59,150 07 Eslimales for rerenue

24,257,298 49 24,601,982 44 18,189,153 96 From Customs..

mirana 21,000,000 00 15,000,000 00 16,000,000 00 Lands........ 2,500,000 00 3,000,000 00 3,500,000 00

Miscellaneous... 500,000 00 500,000 00 500,000 00 Actual receipis

24,000,000 00 18,500,000 00 20,000,000 00 From Customs....... 29,032,508 91 16,214,957 15 16,680,881 00

3,967,682 55 4,857,600 69 11,000,000 00 Miscellaneous... 948,234 79 719,377 71 750,000 00

33,948,426 25 21,791,935 55 28,430,881 00 Note:-The last quarter of Importe and Exports, and of Receipts and Expenditures for 1835, depends on estimates.

Lands..........,

Value of Imports and Consumplion of Foreign Merchandise in the

United States.

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1790 23,000,000 300,000 23,500,000 1813 22,005,000 2,947,845 23,157, 155 1791 | 29,200,000 500,000 30,000,000. || 1814 12,965,000 145,169 15,919,891 1792 31,500,000

1,000,000 31,500,000 ||1815 113,041,274 6,583,350 109,457,924 1793 31,100,000

1,750,000 30,800,000 1816 147,103,000 17,188,555 (132,964,445 1794 34,600,000 6,500,000 29,500,000 | 1817 99,250,000 19,358,069 82,891,931 1795 69,756,269

8,800,000 63,000,000 1818 121,750,000 19,426,696 105,323,304 1796 81,436,164 26,300,000 56,636,164 | 1919 87,125,000 19,165,683 70,959,317 1797 | 75,379,406 27,000,000 50,379,406 | 1820 74,450,000 13,008,029 | 56,441,971 1798 68,551,700 33,000,000 37,531,700 1821 62,585,724 21,302,489 41,283, 236 1799/ 79,069,148 45,523,000 35,546,148 1822 ) 83,241,541 22, 286, 202 60,955,339 1800 91,252,768 49,130,877 14,121,891 || 1823 77,579,267 27,543,622 50,035, 645 1801 111,363,511 46,642,721 66,720,790 1824 80,549,007 25,337, 157 55,211,950 1802 76,333,333 | 35,774,971

42,558,362 1825

96,340,075 32,590,643 63,749,132 1803 64,666,666 13,594,072 | 52,072,594 ||1826 84,974,477 24,539, 612 60,434,965 1804 85,000,000 36,231,597 50,768,403 1827 | 79,454,068 23,403, 136 56,080,932 1805 120,600,000 53,179,019 69,420,981 || 1828 89,509,824 21,595,017 66,914,807 1806 129,410,000 €0,283,234 71,126,766 || 1829 74,499,527 16,659,479 57,934,049 1807 139,500,000 59,643,558 | 81,856,442 || 1830 70,876,920 14,387,479 56,499, 441 1808 56,990,000 12,997,414 46,992,586 || 1831 103, 191, 124 20,093,526 83,157,598 1809 | 59,400,000 20,797,531 41,602,469 || 1832 101,029,266 24,039,473 | 76,989, 793 18101 85,400,000

24,391,295 | 64,008,705 ||1833 108,118,311 19,822,735 89,295,576 1811 53,400,000 16,022,790 40,377,210 1834 126,521,332 23,812,811 102,708,521 1812 77,030,000 9,495,127 71,534,973 ||1835* 151,030,368 | 20,424,213 190,606, 155 • Partly estimated for the quarter ending 30th September, 1835.

REMARKS. 1. Prior to 1821, the Treasury Reports did not give the value of the Imports. Their value froin 1795 to 1801 has been taken from Pitkin's Statisties. The value of those in 1815, trom Seybert. The value of those in 1802, 1803, 1804, 1807, 1817, 1818, 1819, and those from 1790 to 1795, from manuscript notes and estimates now 'made in the Department. The value of those in 1805, 1806, 1808, 1809, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1813, 1814, 1816, and 1820, from calculations and comparisons with other years. The value of the Imports froin 1821 to 1834, inclusive, has been taken from official documents.

In Blodger's Manual, page 62, is an estimate of Imports from 1790 to 1804; but it is too low in amount, being only as follows, though including the stock, furniture, &c. of emigrants. In 1790 817,500,000

In 1795

848,000,000 In 1900 .871,800,000 1791 19,000,000 1796 68,000,000 1801

88,900,000 1792 22 000,000 1797 52,000,000 1802

73,000,000 1793 26,000,000 1798 63,000,000 1803

56,000,000 1794 34,000,000 1799 79,500,000 1804

80,000,000 2. As the books of Exports from 1790 to 1803 were lost or destroyed during the war, (see letter of Register of Treasury, 28th October, 1834,) the amount of Exports of Foreign Merchandise from 1790 to 1796 have now been estimated in the Department from official returns. In Blodget's Manual, page 64, is a different estimate for those years, which is as follows: In 1790

81,800,000 | In 1792 85,945,568 In 1794 816,843,625 1791 3,799,202 1793 10,591,789 1795

29,791,506 Those from 1796 to 1802 have been taken from various sources believed to be authentic, and in part from data given in the annual Treasury Report of December, 1801. Tbeir

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