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Cyane, sloop of war, condemned as unfit for service. Sea Gull, an old steam vessel, decayed and unfit for sea service.

At Gosport, Va.--North Carolina, ship of the line, under repair. Guerriere, frigate, requires very large repairs, or to be rebuilt. Java, frigate, uufit for sea service. Falmouih, sloop of war, requires large repairs. Grainpus, schooner, requires large repairs.

NAVY PENSION FUND.
Amount and description of Slocks, 1st November, 1835.
United States Bank stock,

$ 619,100 00 Peonsylvania 5 per cents.

212,469 16 Maryland 5 per cents.

140,220° 72 Cincinnati 5 per cents.

100,000 00 Washington Lottery stock, 5 per cent.

59,472 40 Bank of Washington stock,

14,000 00 Stock of the Union Bauk, Georgetown,

15,000 00 $1,160,262 28

NAVY HOSPITAL FUND. Balance in the Treasury November 1, 1834, Repayments from November 1, 1834, to October 1, 1835,

$35,559 04

20,349 09 55,908 13

3,029 34 $52,878 79

Payments from November 1, 1834, to October 1, 1835,
Balance in October 1, 1835,

An ACT to regulate the Pay of the Navy of the United States. (Sec. 1.] Be il enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Stales of America in Congress assembled, That froin and after the passage of this act, the annual pay of the officers of the vavy of the United States shall be as follows:

The Senior Caplain.—At all times when in service, four thousand fire bundred dollars.

When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three thousand five hundred dollars.

All other Captains.- When in commanil of squadrons ou foreign stations, four thousand dollars.

When on other duty, three thousand five hundred dollars.
When off duty, two thousand five hundred dollars.

Commanders, or Masters Commandanl.—When attached to vessels for sea service, two thousand five hundred dollars.

When attached to navy yards, or on other duty, two thousand one hundred dollars.

When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, one thousand eight bundred dollars.

Lieutenants.-Commanding, one thousand eight hundred dollars.
On other duty, one thousand five hundred dollars.
Waiting orders, one thousand two hundred dollars.

Assistant Surgeons...Waiting orders, six hundred and fifty dollars.
At sea, nine hundred and fifty dollars.

After passing and found qualified for promotion to surgeon, eight hundred and fifty dollars.

At sea, one thousand two hundred dollars.

When stationed at navy yards, hospitals, rendezvous, and receiving ships, nine hundred and fifty dollars.

After being passed and statioved as above, one thousand one hundred and fisty dollars.

Surgeons.-For the first five years after the date of his commission, one thousand dollars.

For the second five years, one thousand iwo hundred dollars.
For the third five years, one thousand four hundred dollars.
For the fourth five years, one thousand six hundred dollars.

After he shall have been commissioned as a surgeon twenty years and upwards, one thousand eight hundred dollars.

All surgeons of the navy under orders for duty, at navy yards, receiving vessels, rendezvous, or naval hospitals, shall have an increase of onefourth of the foregoing amount of their respective annual pay, from the date of their acceptance of such orders.

All surgeons of the navy ordered to any of the ships or vessels of the United States, commissioned for sea service, shall have an increase of one-third of the foregoing amount of their respective annual pay, from the date of their acceptance of such orders.

All surgeons of the navy, ordered as fleet surgeons, shall have an increase of one-half of their respective annual pay, from the date of their acceptance of such orders.

Chaplains.—When attached to vessels for sea service, or at navy yards, one thousand two hundred dollars,

When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, eight hundred dollars.

Professor of Mathematics.—When attached to vessels for sea service, or in a yard, one thousand two hundred dollars.

Secretaries.—To coninianders of squadrons, when commanding in chief, one thousand dollars.

To commanders of squadrous, when not commanding in chief, nine hundred dollars.

Sailingmasters.—Of a ship of the live, for sea service, one thousand one hundred dollars.

When on other duty, one thousand dollars.

When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, seven hundred and fifty
Hollars.

Second Masters.-When attached to vessels for sea service, seven hun.
dred and fifty dollars.

When on other duty, five hundred dollars.
When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, four hundred dollars.
Passed Midshipmen.-On duty, seven hundred and fifty dollars.
Waiting orders, six hundred dollars.

Warranted Masters' Males.-When attached to vessels for sea service,
or at navy yards, four hundred and fifty dollars.

When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three hundred dollars.
Midshipmen.-Attached to vessels for sea service, four hundred dollars.

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When on other duty, three hundred and fifty dollars.
When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three hundred dollars.
Clerks.-Of a yard, nine hundred dollars.
First clerk to a commandant of a navy yard, nine hundred dollars.

Second clerk to a commandant of a navy yard, seven hundred and fifty dollars.

To commanders of squadrons, captains of fleets, and commanders of vessels, five hundred dollars.

Boatswains, Gunners, Sailmakers, Carpenters. Of a ship of the line, for sea service, seven hundred and fifty dollars.

Of a frigate for sea service, six hundred dollars.
When on other duty, five hundred dollars.

When on leave of absence, or waiting orders, three hundred and sixty dollars.

Officers temporarily performing the duties belonging to those of a higher grade, shall receive the compensation allowed to such higher Igrade, while actually so employed.

No officer shall be put on furlough but at his own request, and all officers so furloughed shall receive one-half only of the pay to which they would have been entitled if on leave of abselice.

If any assistant surgeon shall have been absent from the United States, on duty, at the time ochers of his date were examined, he shall if not rejected at a subsequent examination be entitled to the same rank with

them ; and if from any cause, his relative rank cannot be assigned to lhim, he will retain his original position on the register.

One ration per day, only shall be allowed to all officers whew attached to vessels for sea service.

SEC. 2. And be il fur!her enacted, That no allowance shall hereafter be made to any officer, in the naval service of the United States, for drawing bills, for receiving or disbursing money, or transacting any business for the Goverument of the United States, nor shall he be allowed servants, or pay for servants, or clothing or rations for them or pay for the same, nor shall any allowance be made to him for rent of quarters or to pay rent for furniture, or for lights or suel, or transportjog baggage.

It is hereby expressly declared that the yearly allowance provided in this act is all the pay, compensation, and allowance that shall be received under any circumstances whatever, by any such officer or person, except for travelling expenses when under orders for which teu cents per mile shall be allowed.

[-Approved, March 3d, 1835.]

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An ACT authorizing the construction of a Dry Dock for the naval service. Be it enacted by the Senale and House of Representatires of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Secretary of the Navy, under the direction of the President of the United States, be, and he is herehy, authorized in purchase a site, should it be deemed most advisable, and to cause a dry dock for the naval service to be con. structed, upon the most approved plan, in the harbor of New York or its adjacent waters ; and that toward defraying the expense thereof, the sum of one hundred thousand dollars be, and the same is bereby appropria ted, to be paid out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated.

[ Approved, March 3d, 1835.)

REPORT OF THE POSTMASTER GENERAL.

Post OFFICE DEPARTMENT, December 1, 1835. To the President of the United States :

SIR : During the year ending 30th June, 1835, the post routes of the United States covered about one hundred and twelve thousand seven hundred aud seventy four miles.

In daily and less frequent trips, the mails were carried on these routes about 25,869,486 miles, viz : 16,874,050 miles in four-horse post-coaches and two-horse stages. 7,817,973 miles on horses and in sulkies,

906,959 miles in steanboats.

270,504 iniles in railroad cars. The number of post offices on the 30th June last was 10,770, being an increase of fifty-four within the preceding year.

The system upon which the books of the Department have always been kept preclurles an exact statement of the revenue and expenditure which have accrued within any given period. The following is believed to approximate nearly to the actual income and accruing responsibilities for the two last fiscal years, viz : Gross revenue for the year ending 30th June, 1834, $2,823,749 34 Compensation to postmasters,

$897,317 29 Incidental expenses,

87,744 27 Transportation of the mails,

1,925,543 52 Total expenditure,

2,910,605 08 Balance against the Department,

$86,855 74 Gross revenue for the year ending 30th June, 1835, 82,993,556 66 Compensation to postmasters,

$945,417 84 Inciderital expenses,

92,924 92 Transportation of the mails,

1,719,007 32 Total expenditure,

2,757,350 08 Balance in favor of the Department,

$236,206 58 In the first part of the year, 1835, additional allowances were authorized, as is alleged, a mounting on the 1st of May last, to about $157,000, which have since been suspended, and do not enter into the foregoing statement. If finally admitted, they will reduce the balance in favor of the Department that year 10 about $79,000.

The old books will be closed when all the pecuniary transactions of the Department prior to the 1st of July last are brought upon them. Statements made out from these books, aud other data, show the condi.

Liow of the Department on that day to have been about as follows, viz : Due to contractors and others,

$792,381 92 Due to banks,

272,000 00 Whole debt of the Department,

$1,064,381 92 Amount due to the Department,

$1,128,319 29 Deduct for bad and doubtful debts,

131,327 36 Debt esteemed to be good,

$996,991 93 Cash on hand,

43,689 40 Whole available means,

1,040,681 33

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Balance of debt over available means on 1st July last, 23,700 69 If the suspended allowances be added,

157,000 00 It will niake the debt exceed the available means oa Ist July last,

$180,700 59 The accounts of the postmasters for the quarter ending 30th September last have been so far examined as to show, satisfactorily, that the increase of gross revenue over that of the corresponding quarter of last year is about twelve per cent. The annual saving in the recent letting, of contracts was about $30,000. Predicated on an average increase of revenue throughout the current fiscal year of ter per cent., and on a saving of $25,000 when the contracts recently let shall be executed with necessary alteratious, an estimate of the gross revenue and accruing responsibilities for the year ending 30th June, 1836, indicates the following results, viz : Gross revenue for the year ending 30th June, 1836, $3,292,692 00 Compensation to postmasters,

$1,039,958 00 Incidental expenses,

70,000 00 Transportation of the mails,

1,706,507 00 Total expenditures,

2,816, 465 00 Balance in favor of the Department,

476,227 00

Although the whole of this sum inay not be available, on account of the usual losses and defalcations, it is not doubted that aided by collections of outstanding balances, it will be sufficient to pay off the debts of the Department, and leave a considerable amoust applicable to an extension of mail accommodations.

When the undersigned took charge of this Department, his attention was immediately called to the condition of its finances ; but it was soon found that no satisfactory account of its debts or its means could, within any short period, be obtained from its books. It was only perceived, from current incidents and detached accounts, that the unsatisfied demands of contractors from every quarter of the country were daily accumulating ; that there was a debt of near g300,000 due to banks ; that the outstanding acceptances of the treasurer exceeded $390,000 ; that, a considerable portion of the revenue of some of the large offices for the present calendar year had been anticipated by drafts discounted in banks, which they had been instructed to pay at maturity; that additional allowances bad been recently a uthorized to a considerable amount; that, to provide the means to meet the demands on the Department at Washington, created by the system of acceptances, upwards of two thousand of the most considerable post offices had been directed to deposite their income in banks ; and that these means proving insufficient, the Department was subjected to continual enbarrassnient in devising ways and means to meet ils engagements. At the saine time, it was believed, on all hands, that the current revenue of the Department considerably exceeded its curreut expenditure, and that the aggregate of debt was in progress of diminution. In this state of things it was deemed expedient to make an effort to extricale the Department from its embarrassments. The ineasures resorted to for that purpose were as follows, viz :

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