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Hosea Russell............

Sioux Sub-Agency......
Be. Barrate............... loway Sub-Agency.

Job Everly......................do...........................
James Duncan............

Western Cherokee Sub Agency
John McGill....... .............do..........
James Pool......... Seneca Sub-Agency....
Andrew Woodruff. Western Creek do.....
George May..........................

...do.....................
Gabriel Phillibert.......... Osage Sub-Agency.
E. Brant.................. ........do.........
Charles Graham .......... Upper Sandusky ...........
David Pence...............

........do........
H. J. Granerat............ Sault Ste Marie........
R. J. Granerat............ ........do........
Lambert La piere..........

Rock Island....
Harvey Sturdevant...............do.......
J. B. La Bean.....................do......
Nicholas Senesca!....

.........do.....
Farmers and Assistants.
Benedict Tremble...... Sagapaw...........
G. D. Ruggles and Wife.. Menomonies..........................
Clark Dickinson and Wife. ....do....
Robert Irwin and Wife ...
Nathaniel Perry and Wife.
Henry Baird and Wife....
William Duncan.......... loways....

Laborers.
Edward Yoakum.... Winnebagoes.......
William Yoakum.

........ do......................... O. Allen..................

St. Louis.......
Miamies, Indiana................

Patta watamies....
Millers.
William Barnes.......

....... Shawanees and Delawares.... Thomas T. McCausland.. Senecas.........

Pattawaramies, Indiana.......
David Johnson............ Menomonies.....

Millwright, Choctaws.........
Wheelwrighls.
Jobn A. Hart...... Cherokees, West............
Austin Copeland....................do ...............

Creeks.......

...do.. Wagonmak.......
Physicians.
A. N. McLauren.......... Prairie du Chien......
Charles McDougall..... Fort Winnebago.

Teachers.
J. C. Berryman........... Kicka poos......
John D. Swallow...................do .....................
Henry Remick ............. Delaware.......................
D. Lawrey and Wife...... Winnebagoes.....

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AGENTS FOR PAIISG PENSIONS IN THE DIFFERENT STATES AND

TERRITORIES. Under the Act of the 10th of April, 1816, incorporating the Bank of

the United States. Joshua Wingate, Jr.. Portland, Me. William Richardson.Lexington, Ky. William Appleton.... Boston, Mass. Thomas H. Fletcher. Nashville, Ten. Philip Allen...... Providence, R. 1. James Reynolds...Cincinnati, Ohio.

Heman Allen......... Burlington, Vr. Wm. W. Montgomery. New Orleans. Isaac Lawrence.... New York City. J. C. Wilkins........Natchez, Miss. Nicholas Biddle.. Philadelphia, Pa. P. McLoskey..... Mobile, Alabama. A. Brackenridge...... Pittsburg, Pa. John O. Fallon.... St. Louis, Misso. Richard Anderson.., Richmond, Va. Samuel H. Smith.Washington, D.C. John Huske...... Fayetteville, N. C. John Cumming..... Savannah, Geo. Joseph Johnson.... Charleston, s. C.

Under the Act of 24th April, 1816. Isaac Waldron.. Portsmouth, N. H.Samuel Merrill... Iodianopolis, Ind. James Dodd.......Hartford, Conn. Daniel Hay.........Carmi, Mlinois.

Philemon Dickerson.. Trenton, N. J. Ellis Doty.... .... Detroit, Michigan. James Booth...... New Castle, Del. Wm. E. Woodruff.Little Rock, Ark. H. W. Evans....... Baltimore, Md. Benjamin Chaires.. Tallahassee, Fl. Robert King....... Knoxville, Tenn.

Under the Act of 7th June, 1832. Albert Vewhall, President of Maine Bank, Portland, Maine. John K. Simpson, President of Conmonwealth Bank, Boston, Mass. William T. Grinnell, President of Arcade Bank, Providence, R. I. Ebeneser T. Englesby, President of Bank of Burlington, Burlington, Vt. John Fleming, President of Mechanics' Bank, New York, N. Y. Esra Ames, President of Mechanics' and Farmers' Bank, Albany, N. Y. James Schotl, President of Girard Bank, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. M. Tiernan, President of Merchants' and Manufacturers' Bank, Pilis

burg, Pennsylvania. John Brockenbrough,* President of Bank of Virginia, Richmond, Va. T. Blackwood, Presid't Planters' and Mechanics' Bank, Charleston, S. C. John M. Bass, President of Union Bank of Tennessee, Nashville, Tenn. William K. Blair, Jonesborough, Tennessee. John H. Groesbeck, President of Franklin Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio. Samuel Gustine, President of Planters' Bank, Natchez, Mississippi. George S. Gaines, President of Branch of the Bank of the State of

Alabama, Mobile, Alabama. John P. Van Ness, President of Bank of Metropolis, Washington, D. C. James Marshall, Cashier of Planters' Bank, Savannah, Georgia.

Under the Act of 27th June, 1834. Horace Greene, Decatur, Alabama.

Under the Act of 3d March, 1835. J. W. Campbell, Jackson, Tennessee.

* The Bank of Virginia over which Mr. Brockenbrough presides, is in its corporate capacity, really the agent in this case. The charter of this Bank does not permit any Director of this institution to hold any office

of trust or profit under the United States.

Statement showing the number of Persons now on the rolls of the different States and

Territories, and the number V persons added to the rolls of the different States and Territories, from the 20th October, 1834, to the 20th October, 1835, inclusive.

STATES AND TERRITORIES.

Now on the Rolls.

Added since 20 Oc

tober, 1834.
Invalid
pensioners Under act Under act Under acı

Under aet of 18th of 7th of 15th

Invalid

of 7th Mar. 1818. June, 1832. May, 1828. pensioners June, 1832. 173 788 1,236

22

4

13 177

617
1,342

24
3

2
177
812 1,614
37

33 327 1,104

2,831

61

2

23 16 116 505

2 125

535
1,796

46

4

36 904 2,346 4,825 214

15

144 58 231 787 22

1

19 397

576
1,553

58
10

62
17
13
7
3

1
226
115
104
13
1

8 216

543
1,756
57

42
53
197
17

39 19 104 464 11

25 25 76 414

23 33 35 278

14 8 10 37

1 35 10 16

1 149 236 1,547 18

48 182

404
1,720
52

40
248
663
1,465

58

8

39 90 93 560 18

2

18
56
22
236

3
10

15
72
16
156

2
1

9
1
2
11

3 1

20

3
51
26
49
3
3

3
57
17
52
4

1

Maine,
New Hampshire,
Vermont,
Massachusetts,
Rhode Island,
Connecticut,
New York,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Delaware,
Maryland,
Virginia,
North Carolina,
South Carolina,
Georgia,
Alabama,
Mississippi,
Louisiana,
Tennessee,

Kentucky, -
Ohio,
Indiana,

Illinois,
Missouri,
Florida,
Arkansas,
Michigan,
District of Columbia,

Total,

1,256

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Abstract from the several Pension Agents' reports, showing the number of Pensioners

whose deaths have come to their knowledge since the last report.

Revolu

Revolu-
Act of

Act of STATES AND tionary. Invalid

the 7th STATES AND tionary. Invalid Act of 18 pension

the 7th

Act of 18 pensionTERRITORIES. March,

of June,|| TERRITORIES. ers.

of June, March,

ers. 1832.

1832, 1818.

1818.

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MILITARY ACADEMY.
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITERS.

WEST Point, N. Y., June, 1835.
Hon. Lewis Cass, Secretary of War :

SIR: The undersigned, having attended the general examination of the cadets of the United States Military Academy as a Board of Visiters, submit the following report as the result of their observations.

The board directed their inquiries to the course of instruction, both military and scientific, to the internal police, discipline, and fiscal con. cerns of the institution. In making these inquiries, every facility was afforded by the superintendent and members of the academic staff. Io order that these inquiries might be prosecuted with greater advantage, committees were appointed by the board, with instruction to inquire especially into the portion of the foregoing subjects referred to them, respectively, and to report the result of their observations.

The reports of those committees, which are herewith transmitted, will convey to you much information in detail, wbich could not conveniently be embodied in this report.

As this is professedly a military institution, the attention of the board was first directed to the course of military instruction. Although this branch embraces a wide field, it is intended to speak of it as limited 10 engineering, artillery, and infantry tactics.

Engineering is divided into two branches, civil and military, and in connexion with the latter are taught the science of war, so far as it relates to the attack and defence of military positions, and the providing of defensive means for an army operating in the field.

In the course of civil engineering are taught the properties, preparations, and use of materials of construction ; elementary parts of buildings, and the art of construction generally, including decorative architecture; the manner of laying out and constructing roads; the construction of the various kinds of bridges; the general principles which regulate the removal of obstructions that impede the navigation of rivers : the survey, location, and construction of canals and railroads; and the formation of artificial, and the improvement of natural harbors. . This branch is taught to the first or graduating class by lectures, and a series of drawlings and notes, prepared by the professor from the best authorities, and lithographed at the press belonging in the institution, under the title of “Outlines of the Course of Civil Engineering." Drawings, illustrative of the prominent parts of the subject, aio executed by the cadets ; and these exhitit great nea iness of execution, as well as much precision in detail.

Next in order is the course of military engineering,

This comprises field and permanent fortification. In the first are taught to the same class the principles which regulate the construction fof field intrenchments ; the different kinds of lines ; batteries for the various kinds of orduance; lhe armament of intrenchments, with reference to the attack and defence ; enclosed and detached works; defence of posts, and the construction of military bridges ; permanent fortificasion, including a complete description of the bastion front; the attack and defence of the same; a critical examination of the principal systems of fortifications ; the construction and armament of a fortress; the liy

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draulic works used in the defence of military positions ; mining ; the principles of deflement, and their application to works constructed for inland and maritime defence. Military engineering is taught from a text-book, and from notes prepared with judgment and skill by the professor-the whole being amply illustrated by drawings, executed by the students, under the inimediate supervision of instructers.

To the professional ability of the professor to whom this department is confided, the very able and satisfactory manner in which his pupils acquitted themselves in the various parts of their course at the black board, in presence of the visiters, afforded the most pleasing and ample testimony.

No changes, either in the course of study or organization, are at present contemplated, nor are any deemed necessary. The board, however, would recommend the continuance of small appropriations of money by Congress for the purpose of providing the departinent with such works and models as the professor may from time to time require.

Instruction is given to the cadets of the first class iu artillery tactics during the encampment, which usually commences in June and terminates on the 1st of September following. During this time they are required to recite upon a system of field artillery, at the same time that

they are taught a course of pyrotechny, mortar exercise, and target practice, with guns of various calibers, as well as mortars and howitzers. Cadets of the other classes are also taught the drill of field artillery during the suspension of the other academic studies.

It is thought by the officer at the head of this department that the time allowed for recitation is insufficient, and that much which ought to be studied thoroughly is necessarily passed over rapidly.

In our country there is no establishment provided by law especially for instruction in artillery. All the education our officers receive in this branch of study is, with the exception of the mere drill of an artillery garrison, obtained at this place. This deficiency would seem to suggest the importance of placing this department of the academy upon a more enlarged and permanent basis.

It is the opinion of the board that would be greatly to the advanlage of this course of instruction if a permanent assistant were attached

to it, iustead of the inode now in use of detailing cadets from the graduating class.

In connexion with this subject, the board would remark, that the moving of ordnance on the field, by the bodily exertions of the cadets alone, Jis a requisition upon them of great severity, and is at the saine time obnoxious to the objection, that it keeps the cadets entirely unskilled in the only mode of using the field-piece employed in actual service. The board would, therefore, suggest the propriety of procuring a number of borses sufficient for artillery exercise, and also for instruction in cavalry tactics.

The same horses would be used for both purposes, and the number required would not exceed forty.

Cavalry tactics have never been taught at this academy. Cavalry, as an arm of national defence, is confessedly of great importance. It is subInitted whether instructions in that branch might not be advantageously added to the course of instruction at this institution.

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