Imágenes de páginas
PDF
EPUB

well conducted. Instruction has been given to a considerable extent in the languages of those tribes. There have been printed, at the Press at the Sha wanee station, 312,350 pages-283,000 in the Creek and Choctaw, 16,200 in the Ottoe, 7,750 in the loway, 34,000 in the Paitawatamie, 16,000 in the Shawanee, and 15,000 in the Delaware languages.

The schools among the Choctaws west of the Mississippi have been opened under the direction of competent teachers. The recent coinpletion of the buildings, and other causes, have prevented their operation to the extent and with the advantages that may be confidently anticipated.

In every instance, a knowledge of agriculture and of some mechanic art is imparted to the boys, and of household duties and economy to the girls. The agent for the Delawares and Shawanees states that he was shown cloth that was spun and wove, and shirts and other clothing made by the Indian girls.

The agents for the severa) iribes for whose benefit schools are supported are required to visit and inspect them at least once in each year. At these visits a public examination of the pupils is made, and the attendance of the military officers and of other citizen, wherever convenience will permit, is requested.

EMIGRATION OF INDIANS. In the summer of 1834, extensive arrangements were made for the removal of the Creeks from Alabama. A superintendent and two assistant agents were appointer from among the citizens of that State, and a disbursing officer of great experience was associated with them. The representations received from various sources induced the expectation of a numerous emigration ; but, owing to causes not necessary to be detailed here, only a small body of those Indians conld be induced to emigrate, and these were removed in December, under the direction alone of the disbursing officer, the other agents having been discharged to save expense,

In pursuance of treaty stipulations with the Ottowas of Maumee, Ohio, an officer was despatched in July, 1834, to remore then to the new country. After endeavoring favorably to inipress them with the project, and remaining some time among then, he discovered an unwillingness to remove west, unless they had first sent thither an exploring party, in whose report they might confide. The indulgence was granted them, and the officer took a party of five of the principal chiefs, properly equipped for the enterprise. They returned in November, and, as the country they traversed was reported by the officer to be in all respects a most desirable residence, it was thought the impressions created would bave influenced the tribe to an immediate departure. But delay, under various pretences, ensued, and the season was suffered to pass inactively away. Since then no efforts have been made to remove that tribe.

As soon as the appropriation was passed at the last session of Congress, preparations were made for the removal of the Seminoles. It was believed that there would be very little difficulty in getting off one-third of their whole number, it having been provided that they should remove in three years, one of which had already expired ; and, therefore, the agents of the United Statrs were instructed to proceed immediately in the execution of the task. But it was soon seen that, notwithstauding the exhibition of a considerable military force in Florida, it would be out of the questiou peaceably to effect the object, and the department was willing, upon the recommendation of the agents, to defer the emigration until January, 1836, on the condition, as freely entered into by most of the chiefs, that the whole tribe would then remove without opposition. Notwithstanding this assurance, and the evidently growing popularity of emigration aniong them, the conduct of some of those op. posed to it led to the precaution of strengthening the armed force in Florida. No serious difficulty, is, however, apprehended. The agents have, under instructions, made arrangements by which the Indians will be collected together at various points, inarched to Tampa Bay, and there embarked for the Mississippi river. They will be put on board of steamboats at the Balize and thence taken up the Mississippi to a place on White river, not far from the mouth of the Arkansas, called Rock Row'; thence they will be marched about two hundred and fifty miles to their new country west of Fort Gibson. * Every precaution will be taken to secure the health and comfort of those people. A rigid police will be observed in the sea vessels and steamboats, and whilst on the rivers they will be landed at night and encamped. Good provisions will be regularly issuell, and medical attendance furnished.*

At the last session of Congress appropriation was made for the removal of the united nation of the Chippewa, Ditowa, and Paita watamie Indians from the country recently purchased from them, situated around the head of Lake Michigan. Those Indians are allowed, by the treaty, to remain three years on the lands they bave ceded; but it was believed, from the denionstrations made by then, that, if the exploring expedition stipulated for should report favorably, there would be no difficulty in effecting speedily a large removal. Accordingly, an officer was, at an early day, despatched to their country, with directions to procure an outfit for a party of brıy persons. This party was conducted to the country assigned the tribe, situated north of the northwest corner of Missouri, by an intelligent gentleman, who reports that he had great dif. ficulty in accomplishing the object in view, growing out of the dislike on the persons composing his party to the duty they had unde, taken to per

form. He gives a very favorable account of the country, representing many portions of it as highly susceptible of cultivation, and all of it as well calculated for those for whom it is designed. The results produced by the return of the party were much relied upon, and the officer 10 whom is intrusted the duty of removal has been uniemitting in his exertions to push forward those Indians whose inclinations were supposed to be at all favorable to emigrating. At the last dates he was advancing towards the Mississippi, and had a considerable body of Indians with bim, with prospect of large accessions. He may reinove this season from fifteen hundred to two thousand.

A disbursing officer has been continued, together with the superintendent, in the Cherokee country east. The peculiar relations of the Cherokees with the General Goveroment, and the obstructions to the

1

• The war with the Seminoles, which has occurred since this report was made, will be Ipoticed with the affairs of 1836, in the next Volume.

1

making of a treaty that would be unexceptionable, have operated within the past year to prevent extensive emigration.

The result of emigration bas already been decidedly favorable; though from the short time since large bodies were removed, it nright readily be supposed that the disadvantages of new locations in a hitherto uncultivated country would still be felt by even the more industrious, skilful, and enterprising whites, most of the emigrants are known to be more comfortably situated, to have becone more attentive to agricultural pursuits, and to have indulged less in those practices that were so de. structive to their prosperity, than before emigration. The Choctaws were to have been provided according to treaty with four hundred looms, une thousand ploughs, besides hoes, axes, cards, wheels, iron, &c. &c

and rifles and ammunition. The ploughs, hoes, and other smaller arti. cles, have been procured, and perhaps one third of the looms and wheels manufactured. The supplying the remainder of these last-named articles must, considering the circumstances, be a work of time. It was found iinpolitic to have them made at a distance ; their great bulk would have created an enormous proportional expense. They have therefore been in the process of manufacture in the Choctaw country.

It is known that many of the Choclaws, to whom, under the rules of distribution, these articles must l'all, are not now, and cannot be for some time, the fit recipients of such bounty. li has, therefore, been thought proper to attempt to annul the contract under which they are being

manufactured. The instruments of agriculture, with the simpler machines for manufacturing, are in universal demand. The Paita wala mies of Indiana are also entitled to treaty articles of the same description with those of the Choctaws. The Quapa ws, a part only of whom have gone from Arkansas Territory to the country assigned them west of the western boundary of Missouri, one-half of the tribe having joined the Caddoes on Red river, have been supplied with a variery of articles, consisting of blankets, agricultural instruments, and carpenter's tools. A few luoms were also st lated for. The Cherokee emigrants are entitled to rifles, blankets, kettles, and some tobacco; the Creeks to rifles and blackets; and the Seminoles to blankets and frocks. No agricultural or manufacturing implements are guarantied to these three tribes. The lastnamed tribe will perhaps be more in need of agricultural instruction than any other that has eurigrated; the first, with more skill, but with a greater degree of vacillation- -a more disturbed political condition—has raised large surplus quantities of grain, and evinced west, as it has done east of the Mississippi, some skill in manufactures. Nor have the Choctaw's and Creeks been wanting in agricultural success, for it has been ascertained ibat a considerable proportion of the coru purchased to subsist Dewly arrived emigrants was raised by those of prior settlement ; and it has not unfrequently happened that large punibers of emigrants were enabled to raise their own bread before the expiration of the year, during which they are entitled to subsistence, and to dispose of a surplus. There can, then, be no hesitancy in believing that the condition of the emigrant Indians has become decidedly ameliorated. Nothing, indeed, seems to be wanting to create a progressive stale of improvement, but a perseverance on the part of the United States in such a course towards ibem as shall accommodate itself to their gradual advances in civilization.

INDIAN AGENTS.
Officers and other persons employed in the Indian Department.

Name and Office.

Where Employed.

Compen-
sation.

............

#

Superintendent of Indian

Affairs.
William Clark........ St. Louis......

1500 00 George Maguire, Clerk.....do....., Superintendent...... 1000 00 A. R. Chouteau, Clerk.....do......Disbursing Agent........ 800 00

Agenls.
Lawrence Taliaferro...... St. Peters...................... 1500 00
Joseph M. Street....... Rock Island.........

1500 00 Richard W. Cuinmins.... Northern Agency, West Territory.. 1500 00 John Dougherty. Upper Missouri.......

1500 00 George Boyd.............. Green Bay ......

1500 00 llenry R. Schoolcıaft.. Mackinac................

1500 00 Benjamin Reynolds....... Chickasa w Agency.

1500 00 Wm. Armstrong, also

acting Superintendent Southern Agency, W. Territory... 1500 00

West. Territory....
George M. Clark, Clerk... W. Ter'y Office Acting Super’dent.. 500 00
John Ruland, Special Ag't St. Louis......

1200 00
Sub-Agents.
Henry Connor........ Michigan......

750 00 James Jackson ......... Maumee

750 00 Joshua Pilcher......... ... Sioux Sub-Agency.

750 00 William M. Fulkerson.... Mandan.....

750 00 Andrew S. Hughes....... loway....

750 00 George Vashon......

........... Western Cherokee ................! 750 00 Wharton Rector .......... .Do....Creek.......

750 00 P. L. Chouteau... Osage .........

750 00 Purdy McElvain........ Upper Sandusky, O........

750 00 James Stryker...... Buffalo, N. Y........

750 00 Jannes B. Dallam... Upper Mississippi......

750 00 Leonard Tarrant.. Creek Agency, Ga.

750 00 Interprelers. Jacques Mitte...

300 00 ............. St. Louis, Mo......... Joseph Barron............ Logansport, Indiana ...

300 00 Alexander Robinson...... Chicago...........

300 00 Cudjoe....... Seminole Agency

300 00 Scott Campbell........ St. Peters...................

300 00 Antoine Leclair.......... Rock Island........

300 00 Joseph James.............. North Agency, W. Territory James Connor..............

...do................ Peter Cudjoe....... ...........................do................

800 00 Henry Clay....... .................do................. Joseph Pa;ks....

..do................ Louis La Chappelle.... Upper Missouri...

300 00 Charles Maubrain.... ....do.....

300 00

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

.............

[ocr errors]

...........................

................

..........................

.................

.......

...........

........

........

...................

.........

Richard Prickette ......... Green Bay......

300 00 William Johnston.. ........ Mackinac.......................

300 00 Jackson Kemp....... Chickasa w Agency.....

300 00 R. M. Jones.... Choctaw Agency, West..

300 00 J. B'te Dorian...... Sioux Sub-Agency...

300 00 Toussant Charbonneau.., Mandan...........................

300 00 Jeffrey Dorney.. Ioway..........................

50 00 Paddy Cars............... Creek Agency, Ga................. 300 00 Cherokees, West......

300 00 Creek......do.......

300 00 P. Mongrain...... Osage Sub-Agency..

300 00 Vacant...... Quapaws, West....................

300 00 James Rankin....... Upper Sandusky

50 00 Nathan Strong... Buffalo, N. Y..........

300 00 Michael St Cyr....... ......... Fort Winnebago.......

300 00 Amable Grignon)........... Prairie du Chien...................

300 00 Antoine Dunord........ ..... Detroit ........

300 00 Edward D. Rucker..........do..Office Dis’g Ag't....p. month 25 00 Black and Gunsmiths and

Assistants.
Allansan Holdridge....... Cherokees, West....

480 00 Aaron Price.... ........do................

240 00 Izreal Dodge....... Chocktaws, West..................

480 00 William Hargrove........ ........do..........................

240 00 Antoine Pepper..... St. Peters..........................

480 00 Joseph Reche.. ........do.........................

240 00 Samuel Gilbert............. Prairie du Chien....................

480 00 Morris Mott.............. ....do..........

480 00 Oliver Gilbert.....................do......

240 00 Louis Frum.......................do........

240 00 John P. Smith ............. North Agency, W. Territory...

480 00 Claybourne Colbert.............. .....do.....

480 00 William Donaldson....... ........do..........................

480 00 Lewis Jones.......

480 00 ........do...... Robert Dunlop....... ........do..........................

480 OU William Carlisle........... ........do....... .......

480 00 William V. Smith ......... ........do.........

240 00 Preston Moore....... ........do................

240 00 R. D. McKinney. ....do...............

240 00 John Barnes.............. .....do........

240 00 Samuel Boydson..................do..............

240 00 Jackson .......... .....do...............

240 00 John Gilmore............. Upper Missouri..

480 00 Jas. M. Gilmore.... ........do........

240 00 Jos. Jourdrain...... Green Bay......

480 00 Robert Machlin...... ......do..........................

240 00 Rufus Hunter....... Mackinac..........................

480 00 Richard Prickett........... ..do..........................

240 00 James Stevens.. Fort Winnebago........................

480 00 Christian Watcher........ ........do..........................

240 00 Leonard Groom..... Sioux Sub-Agency.

480 00

.......................

......................

........

..................

« AnteriorContinuar »