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“ Tell me not of rights_talk not of the property of the planter in his slaves. I deny the right--I acknowledge not the property. The principles, the feelings of our common nature, rise in rebellion against it. Be the appeal made to the understanding or to the heart, the sentence is the same that rejects it. In vain you tell me of laws that sanction such a claim! There is a law above all the enactments of human codes—the same throughout the world, the same in all times; it is the law written by the finger of God on the heart of man; and by that law, unchangeable and eternal, while men despise fraud, and loathe rapine and abhor blood, they will reject, with indignation, the wild and guilty phantasy that man can hold property in man.”—LORD BROUGHAM.

CONTENTS

CHAPTER I.

His birth-notice of his father-early education-wins several lite

rary prizes—a close student of history-his youth-early associations—passage from Mr. Everett-remarks of Mr. Sumner on Boston-graduates- at Harvard College-studies law—a diligent student-eloquent passage from Dr. Chalmers, on genius and industry-Mr. Sumner writes for the American Jurist-becomes its editor-admitted to the bar-practices in Boston-appointed reporter of the Circuit Court — lectures to the law students of Cambridge - edits an important law-book -- his position as a lawyer

13

CHAPTER II.

Visit to Europe-letters of introduction-received in England with

marked attention—attends the debates in Parliament-favorably received by members of the English Bar, &c.--visits Paris—writes a defence of the American claim to the Northeastern boundaryvisits Italy-studies art and literature there-visits Germany, returns to Boston-again lectures in Cambridge-publishes an edition of Vesey's Reports-delivers his oration, entitled the True Grandeur of Nations—Judge Story's opinion of it-eloquent pasBage on the Reigu of Peace

26

CHAPTER III.

Spoken of as the successor of Judge Story in the Law School

remarks of Story and Kent—espouses the cause of freedomcompared to Charles James Fox - delivers a speech against the admission of Texas as a slave State extracts from the speech

40

CHAPTER IV.

Pronounces an oration before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Har

vard University--beautiful extracts-sentiment of John Quincy Adams--delivers a speech on the anti-slavery duties of the Whig party--glowing passages from this speech--delivers a brilliant lecture on white slavery in the Barbary States...

46

CHAPTER V.

Pronounces an Oration before the Literary Societies of Amherst

College-extracts—delivers an oration before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Union College-splendid passages from this addressmakes a speech before the Whig State Convention of Massachusetts, at Springfield-forcible passages quoted from this address remarks..

59

CHAPER VI.

Delivers a Speech in a Mass Convention at Worcester, Massachu

setts-extracts—delivers an address before the American Peace Society in Boston-admirable passages quoted from this effortremarks, &c..

73

CHAPTER VII.

Delivers a Speech at the Free Soil State Convention-remarks on

this effort--forcible extracts-Mr. Sumner ever true to the cause of freedom....

85

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CHAPTER VIII.

Elected to the United States Senate-Letter of Acceptance-Speeches

on the Iowa Railroad Bill-An extract_delivers his celebrated Speech in the Senate, entitled Freedom National, Slavery Sectional-passage quoted on Freedom of Speech-the Perorationremarks...

96

CHAPTER IX.

Delivers a Speech at the Plymouth Festival—its peroration quoted

makes his memorable Speech in the Senate, Land of Freedom; Freedom National-extracts-his final protest for himself and the Clergy of New England against Slavery in Nebraska and Kansas-his remarks on that occasion..

112

CHAPTER X.

Delivers his speech in the Senate on the Boston Memorial for the

Repeal of the Fugitive Slave Bill, etc.-makes an address before the Mercantile Library Association of Boston-delivers his speech in the Senate, entitled the Demands of Freedom-Repeal of the Fugitive Slave Bill-pronounces an address at the Metropolitan Theatre, New York—eloquent extracts..

124

CHAPTER XI.

The late Session of Congress-Mr. Sumner delivers his great Speech

on Kansas—the assault in the Senate chamber-Mr. Sumner's statement respecting it-indignation meetings--remarks.... 138

CHAPTER XII.

Oratorical character of Mr. Sumner-his person-his delivery-his

voice-his intellect--his learning-his imagination, &c.-his love of freedom--his style of composition--compared to Fisher Ames -concluding remarks...

151 SPEECH

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