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into consideration all subjects relating to the military establishment and public defense wbich may be referred to them by the House, and to report their opinion thereupon; and also to report, from time to time, such measures as may contribute to economy and accountability in the said establishment.- March 13, 1822.

88. It shall be the duty of the Committee on the Militia to take into consideration and report on all subjects connected with the organizing, arming, and disciplining the militia of the United States.- December 10, 1835.

89. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Naval Affairs to take into consideration all matters which concern the naval establishment, and which shall be referred to them by the House, and to report their opinion thereupon; and also to report, from time to tiine, such ineasures as may contribute to economy and accountability in the said establishment. - March 13, 1822.

90. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Foreign Affairs to take into consideration all matters which concern the relations of the United States with foreign nations, and which shall be referred to them by the House; and to report their opinion on the same.—March 13, 1822.

91. It shall be the duty of the Committee on the Territories to exam. ine into the legislative, civil, and criminal proceedings of the Territories; and to devise and report to the House such means, as in their opin. ion, may be necessary to secure the rights and privileges of residents and non-residents.- December 13, 1825.

92. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Revolutionary Pensions to take into consideration all such matters respecting pensions for sery. ices in the revolutionary war, other than invalid pensions, as shall be referred to them by the House-January 10, 1831; and all matters re. lating to pensions to soldiers of the war of 1812 shall be referred to the said comunittee.—March 26, 1867.

93. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Invalid Pensions to take into consideration all such matters respecting invalid pensions as shall be referred to them by the House-January 10, 1831; except such as relate to pensions to soldiers of the war of 1812. - March 26, 1867.

94. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Roads and Canals to take into consideration all such petitions and matters or things relating to roads and cavals, and the iinprovement of the navigation of rivers, as shall be presented, or may come in question, and be referred to them by the House; and to report thereupon, together with such propositions relative thereto as to them shall seem expedient.- December 15, 1831.

95. It shall be the duty of the Comunittee on Patents to consider all subjects relating to patents which may be referred to them; and report their opinion thereon, together with such propositions relative thereto as may seem to them expedient.-September 15, 1837.

96. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds to consider all subjects relating to the public edifices and grounds within the city of Washington, and all the public buildings constructed by the United States, which may be referred to them; and report their opinion thereon, together with such propositions relating thereto as may seein to them expedient. —September 15, 1837; March 10, 1871.

97. "This rule, which prescribed the duty of the Committee of Revisal and Unfinished Business, was virtually rescinded by the resolution of July 25, 1868, abolishing the said committee and creating a Committee on the Revision of the Laws.]

98. It shall be the duty of the Committee of Accounts to superintend and control the expenditures of the contingent fund of the House of RepresentativesDecember 17, 1805 ; also to audit and settle all accounts which may be charged thereon.--December 23, 1811.

99. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Mileage to ascertain and report the distance to the Sergeant-at-Arms for which each member sball receive pay.—September 15, 1837.

100. There shall be referred by the Clerk to the members of the Committee on Pr nting on the part of House all drawings, maps, charts, or other papers, which may at any time come before the House for engrav. ing, lithograpbing, or publishing in any way; which committee shall report to the House whether the same ought, in their opinion, to be pub. lished; and if the House order the publication of the same, that said committee shall direct the size and manner of execution of all such maps, charts, drawings, or other papers, and contract by agreement, in writ. ing, for all such engraving, lithographing, printing, drawing, and color. ing, as may be ordered by the House; which agreement, in writing, shall be furnished by said committee to the Committee of Accounts, 10 govern said committee in all allowances for such works, and it shall be in order for said committee to report at all times. - March 16, 1844.

101. It shall be in order for the Committee on Enrolled Bills-- March 13, 1822—and the Committee on Printing to report at any time.- March 16, 1860.

102. Seven additional standing committees shall be appointed at the commencement of the first session in each Congress, whose duty shall continue until the first session of the ensuing Congress.-March 30, 1816.

To consist of five members each. 1. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Department of State;

2. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Treasury Department;

3. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Department of War;

4. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Department of the Navs;

5. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Post Office;

6. A comunittee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the public buildings, [to consist of seven members, and this amendment shall continue in force only during the present session.June 7, 1876.)

7. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Iuterior Department; and

8. A committee on so much of the public accounts and expenditures as relates to the Department of Justice.

103. It shall be the duty of the said comunittees to examine into the state of the accounts and expenditures respectively submitted to them, and to inquire and report particularly

Whether the expenditures of the respective departments are justified by law;

Whether the claims from time to time satisfied and discharged by the respective departments are supported by sufficient vouchers, establishing their justness both as to their character and amount;

Whether such claims have been discharged out of funds appropriated therefor, and whether all moneys have been disbursed in conformity with appropriation laws; and

Whether any, and wbat, provisions are necessary to be adopted to provide more perfectly for the proper application of the public moneys, and to secure the government from demands unjust in their character or extravagant in their amount.

And it shall be, moreover, the duty of the said committees to report, from time to time, whether any, and what, retrenchment can be made in the expenditures of the several departments, without detriment to the public service; whether any, and what, abuses at any time exist in the failure to enforce the payment of moneys which may be due to the United States from public defaulters or others; and to report, from time to time, such provisions and arrangements as may be necessary to add to the economy of the several departments and the accountability of their officers.- March 30, 1816. ' It shall be the duty of the several committees on public expenditures to inquire whether any officers belonging to the branches or depart. ments, respectively, concerning whose expenditures it is their duty to inquire, have become useless or unnecessary; and to report, froin time to time, on the expediency of modifying or abolishing the saine ; also, to examine into the pay and emoluments of all officers under the laws of the United States; and to report, from time to time, such a reduc. tion or increase thereof as a just economy and the public service may require.February 19, 1817.

OF COMMITTEES OF THE WHOLE.

104. The House may at any time, by a vote of a majority of the members present, suspend the rules and orders for the purpose of going into the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union; and also for providing for the discharge of the Committee of the Whole House, and the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the UnionJanuary 25, 1848–from the further consideration of any bill referred to it, after acting without debate on all amendments pending and that may be offered.- March 11, 1844.

105. In forming a Committee of the Whole House, the Speaker shall leave bis chair, and a chairman, to preside in compittee, shall be ap. pointed by the Speaker.-April 7, 1789.

106. Whenever the Committee of the Whole on the state of tbe Union, or the Committee of the Whole House, finds itself without a quorum, the cbairman sball cause the roll of the House to be called, and thereupon the committee sball rise, and the chairman shall report the names of the absentees to the House, which shall be entered on the journal.-December 18, 1847.

107. Upon bills committed to a Committee of the Whole House, the bill shall be first read throughout by the Clerk, and then again read and debated by clauses, leaving the preamble to be last considered; the body of the bill shall not be lefaced or interlined; but all amendments, noting the page and line, shall be duly entered by the Clerk on a separate paper, as the same shall be agreed to by the committee, and so reported to the House. After report, the bill shall again be subject to be debated and amended by clauses before a question to engross it be taken.April 17, 1789.

108. All amendments made to an original motion in committee shall be incorporated with the motion, and so reported.-April 7, 1789.

109. All amendments made to a report committed to a Committee of the Whole House shall be noted and reported, as in the case of bills.April 7, 1789.

110. No motion or proposition for a tax or charge upon the people shall be discussed the day on which it is made or offered, and every such proposition shall receive its first discussiou in a Committee of the Wbole House.-November 13, 1794.

111. No sum or quantum of tax or duty, voted by a Committee of the Whole House, sball be increased in the House until the motion or proposition for such increase shall be first discussed and voted in a Committee of the Whole House; and so in respect to the time of its continuance.—November 13, 1794.

112. All proceedings touching appropriations of money and all bills making appropriations of money or property, or requiring such appropriations to be made, or authorizing payments out of appropriations already made, shall be first discussed in a Committee of the Whole House.January 13, 1874.

113. The rules of proceedings in the House shall be observed in a Committee of the Whole House so far as they may be applicable, except the rule limiting the times of speaking—April 7, 1789; but no member shall speak twice to any question until every member choosing to speak shall have spoken.- December 18, 1805.

114. In Committee of the Whole on the state of the Union, the bills shall be taken up and disposed of in their order on the calendar; but when objection is made to the consideration of a bill, a majority of the committee shall decide, without debate, whether it shall be taken up and disposed of or laid aside : Provided, That general appropriation bills, and, in time of war, bills for raising inen or money, and bills concerning a treaty of peace, shall be preferred to all other bills, at the dis. cretion of the committee; and when demanded by any member, the question sball first be put in regard to them—July 27, 1848; and all debate on special orders shall be confined strictly to the measure under consideration.—March 16, 1860.

OF BILLS.

115. Every bill shall be introduced on the report of a committee, or by motion for leave. In the latter case, at least one day's notice shall be given of the motion in the House, or by filing a memorandumi thereot with the Clerk, aud having it entered on the journal; and the motiou shall be made, and the bill introduced, if leave is given, when resolu. tions are called for; such motion, or the bill when introduced, may be comunitted.-April 7, 1789; September 15, 1837; and March 2, 1838. But the Speaker sball pot entertain a motion for leave to introduce a bill or joint resolution for the establishment or change of post-routes, and all propositions relating thereto shall be referred, under the rule, like peti. tions and otber papers, to the appropriate committee.—May 5, 1870.

116. Every bill shall receive three sereral readings in the House previous to its passage ; and bills shall be dispatched in order as they were introduced, unless wbere the House shall direct otberwise; but no bill sball be twice read on the same day without special order of the HouseApril 7, 1789.

117. The first reading of the bill shall be for information, and, if opposition be made to it, the question sball be, “Sball this bill be rejected ?" If no opposition be made, or if the question to reject be negatived, the bill sball go to its second reading without a question.— April 7, 1789.

118. Upon the second reading of a bill, the Speaker shall state it as ready for commitment or engrossment; and, if committed, then a ques. tion shall be, whether to a select or standing committee, or to a Committee of the Whole House; if to a Committee of the Whole House, the House shall determine on what day-November 13, 1794; if no motion be made to commit, the question shall be stated on its engrossment; and if it be not ordered to be engrossed on the day of its being reported, it shall be placed on the general file on tbe Speaker's table, to be taken ap in order.- September 14, 1837. But if the bill be ordered to be engrossed, the House shall appoint the day when it shall be read the third time.-November 13, 1874.

119. General appropriation bills shall be in order in preference to any other bills of a public nature, unless otherwise ordered by a majority of the House.- September 14, 1837.

And the House may at any time, by a vote of the majority of the members present, make any of the general appropriation bills a special order.-March 16, 1860.

120. No appropriation shall be reported in such general appropriation bills, or be in order as an amendment thereto, for any expenditure not previously authorized by law-September 14, 1837—unless in continu. ation of appropriations for such public works and objects as are already in progress; nor shall any provision in any such bill or amendment thereto, changing existing law, be in order except such as, being germane to the subject matter of the bill, sball retrench expenditures.January 18, 1876.

121. Upon the engrossment of any bill making appropriations of money for works of internal improvement of any kind or description, it shall be in the power of any member to call for a division of the question, so as to take a separate vote of the House upon each item of improvement or appropriation contained in said bill, or upon such items separately, and others collectively, as the members making the call may specify; and if one-fifth of the members present second said call, it shall be the duty of the Speaker to make such divisions of the question, and put them to vote accordingly.-February 26, 1846.

122. The bills from the Court of Claims shall, on being laid before the House, be read a first and second time, committed to a Committee of the Whole House, and, together with the accompanying reports, printed.-March 16, 1860.

123. A motion to strike out the enacting words of a bill shall have precedence of a motion to amend; and, if carried, shall be considered equivalent to its rejection.-March 16, 1822. Whenever a bill is reported from a Committee of the Whole, with a recommendation to strike out the enacting words, and such recommendation is disagreed to by the House, the bill shall stand recommitted to the said committee without further action by the House.—March 16, 1860. But before the question of concurreuce is submitted, it is in order to entertain a motion to refer the bill to any committee, with or without instructions, and when the same is again reported to the House, it shall be referred to the Com. mittee of the Whole without debate, and resume its original place on the calendar.-May 26, 1870.

124. After commitment and report thereof to the House, or at any time before its passage, a bill may be recommitted-April 7, 1789; and should such recommitment take place after its engrossment, and an amendment be reported and agreed to by the House, the question shall be again put on the engrossment of the bill.-March 16, 1860.

125. All bills ordered to be engrossed shall be executed in a fair round hand.-April 7, 1789.

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