Theories of Illness: A World Survey

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University of Pittsburgh Pre, Dec 15, 1980 - 144 pages
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An important contribution to medical anthropology, this work defines the principal causes if illness that are reported throughout the world, distinguishing those involving natural causation from the more widely prevalent hypotheses advancing supernatural explanations.

 

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I have found the research in this text particularly enhancing and understandable with clear providence of articulate examples. It is indeed a great source of knowledge in relation to the anthropology of illness.

Contents

I Primitive Medicine
3
II Theories of Natural Causation
8
III Theories of Supernatural Causation
17
IV Behavioral Science and the Comparative Ethnographic Method
28
V Regional Analysis
42
VI Mans Ideational Environment
53
VII Witchcraft Theories and the CircumMediterranean
64
IX Incidence of Spirit Aggression Theories
72
X Aggression and Its Projection
77
XI The Pastoral Relationship
82
XII Sin Sex and Sickness
88
The Societies Surveyed Identification and Bibliography
99
Index
123
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About the author (1980)

George Peter Murdock (1897-1985) was Andrew Mellon Professor of Social Anthropology at the University of Pittsburgh.

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