A Discipline Divided: Schools and Sects in Political Science

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SAGE, 1990 - 348 pages
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A Discipline Divided is a collection of coherent and timely articles that discuss the emergence and divergence of the two dominant camps of political science: ideology and methodology. Almond examines the `hard' versus `soft' science argument, the history of model fitting in communism studies, the strengths and weaknesses of the rational choice movement and the historical forces and processes that have shaped political culture.
 

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Contents

Poiitical Selene as Science
13
Clouds Clocks and the Study of Politics
32
Model Fitting in Communism Studies
66
Rational Choice Theory and the Social Sciences
117
The Study of Political Culture
138
Communism and Political Culture Theory
157
Pluralism Corporatism and Professional Memory
173
The Return to the State
189
The Development of Political Development
219
The InternationalNational Connection
263
A Biographical Memoir
290
Appendix B Chicago Days
309
Index
329
About the Author
348
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About the author (1990)

Born in Rock Island, Illinois, American political scientist Gabriel Almond was educated at the University of Chicago. During World War II, he was associated with the Office of War Information and also with the War Department in Europe. After the war he served on the faculties of several universities, including Princeton University, Yale University, and Stanford University. He has also been visiting professor at the University of Tokyo and the University of Belo Horizonte in Brazil as well as a consultant to the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Air Force. Almond is most noted for his work in comparative politics and comparative political systems. He is the author and coauthor of several landmark books, including The Civic Culture: Political Attitudes and Democracy in Five Nations The Civic Culture: (1963), a seminal piece in the field (coauthored with Sidney Verba). Among Almond's other well-known works are The Politics of Developing Areas (1960) and Comparative Politics: A Developmental Approach (1966). A member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Political Science Association, Almond received the James Madison Award in 1972 for his work in the field.

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